Sunday, October 26, 2014
   
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What you - and we - learned from the OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll

Introduction

The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll was a journey of discovery – for both us and you. Read why and how we did this poll.

Besides voting for your jazz favourites, you also let us know about you and what you thought of the local jazz scene, and we've also analyzed those results. Sit back and discover!

What do jazz fans think of the local scene?

Respondents were asked to “list up to 5 individual words or a short phrase” that they felt describes the all-year jazz and improvised music scene in Ottawa-Gatineau. Here's what they came up with.

The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll: What do jazz fans think of the scene? © Brett Delmage, 2014

Click on the image for a larger view. Thanks to JasonDavies.com for the word cloud generator.

Who's listening ?

We analyzed some demographics that respondents provided us with. We compared the results with the StatsCan 2011 Canadian census data, adjusted to 2014.  (We again need to state that this poll was not a random survey of jazz fans; however, we were careful to create the poll and attract respondents to it in an unbiased manner. A truly random poll, that could be more reliably representative of the population of Ottawa-Gatineau jazz listeners and musicians, was beyond our resources.)

Learn who's listening

 

Some praise, some sorrow at jazz festival programming

Jazz fans have decided what they liked most about jazz in Ottawa-Gatineau in 2013, in The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll. These poll results are part of the complete report that OttawaJazzScene.ca is publishing this week.
Find out more about this poll and view all the results.

Favourite local jazz/improvised music festival: Ottawa Jazz Festival (June)

Runner-up: Merrickville's Jazzfest (October)

How the poll defined this category: “Nominees include festivals within 100 km of Parliament Hill, OttawaJazzScene.ca's listing area.”

The summer Ottawa Jazz Festival was the overwhelming favourite festival. It wasn't the leader without controversy, however.

Unlike any other favourite in this poll, there were a number of negative or more-in-sorrow-than-anger comments about the festival, and in particular its non-jazz programming.

No photo available. The Ottawa Jazz Festival did not permit OttawaJazzScene.ca's photojournalist to report their festivals from 2011-2014. So we can't bring you the full picture.

When it showcased jazz, respondents loved it. “Nothing beats the jazz festival! Low prices for students, incredible lineups year after year but this year was very special with Wayne Shorter, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Peter Bernstein, and a wealth of Canadian jazz artists."

“2013 marked somewhat of a refocus on jazz from the previous year. Thoroughly enjoyed the performances. Volunteers are terrific.”

“Biggest budget, so we hear lots of international jazz artists.”

“Jazzfest is spectacular. It's an extremely well-run festival with a diverse lineup. The shows I saw there last year were some of the best I have ever seen.”

“Great names. Brings a wider audience into the jazz world.”

“The lineup is amazing and the atmosphere is great for listening to music,” said one. Another praised the festival's “outdoors atmosphere”.

Since 2011, however, the headliners on the festival's outdoor main stage and related promotion of the festival have increasingly moved to non-jazz, with performers including Robert Plant, Elvis Costello, Steve Martin, Willie Nelson, Daryl Hall, David Byrne, and The Doobie Brothers. Similarly, the OLG late-night stage has featured an increased percentage of non-jazz artists, as have the free concerts by local musicians on prime weekends spots.

One listener was so annoyed that he/she couldn't even wait for the festivals question at the end of the poll, but included this comment under Concert Venues: “Confed Park is no longer hosting jazz. The 'jazz' festival is no longer. Mostly rock and forms of music not even remotely connected to jazz. Let's get back to basics. A Somalian folksinger or a famous comedian playing a banjo is not jazz. Back to basics, please.”

Read more: Some praise, some sorrow at jazz festival programming

 

Great teachers make the difference for jazz camps

Jazz fans have decided what they liked most about jazz in Ottawa-Gatineau in 2013, in The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll. These poll results are part of the complete report that OttawaJazzScene.ca is publishing this week.
Find out more about this poll and view all the results.

Favourite jazz camp: Carleton University Jazz Camp

Runner-up: JazzWorks Summer Jazz Workshop and Composers' Symposium

©Brett Delmage, 2010

How the poll defined this category: “A jazz camp is a multi-day/evening workshop that improves musicians' facility in playing jazz through intensive teaching and live performances with a variety of instrumentation and other players.”

The Carleton University Jazz Camp, which will mark its fifth anniversary this August, came out well ahead in votes over older camps in this category. The main reason stated: its faculty.

“The teachers are welcoming and friendly,” said one. “Incredible faculty every year, good location, great mix of class types,” said another. “Great faculty and program,” said a third.

“Great guest artists (Joel Frahm, André White) who gave inspiring masterclasses. Great concerts every night and getting to work in a small group under the direction of Joel was huge.”

The camp's in-town location – at the university, using its music department facilities and Kailash Mital theatre – was also appreciated by some: “It is cheaper and easier to get to,” said one. “So much opportunity to play, great location and facilities,” said another. One respondent appreciated its “strong Carleton University connection”.

Read more: Great teachers make the difference for jazz camps

 

Local jazz CDs inspire many viewpoints - but they're not well enough known

Jazz fans have decided what they liked most about jazz in Ottawa-Gatineau in 2013, in The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll. These poll results are part of the complete report that OttawaJazzScene.ca is publishing this week.
Find out more about this poll and view all the results.

Favourite jazz or improvised music CD:  Nepean All-City Jazz Band - The 25th Anniversary Concert

Runner-up:  Garry Elliott and Steve Boudreau - Pre-Dawn Skies

How the poll defined this category: “A jazz or improvised music CD released by an Ottawa-Gatineau musician or group in 2013.”

Ottawa-Gatineau jazz audiences have highly diverse tastes: that's the main conclusion one can draw from the results and comments in this category. There was support for many CDs; there were also respondents who strongly disliked some of the groups.

But overall the poll introduced respondents to new-to-them albums. “The Ottawa scene is producing some interesting music. I wish I could buy them all,” said one comment.

Nepean All-City Jazz Band: "Great band, full sound"

Well out in front was the Nepean All-City Jazz Band's album celebrating its 25th anniversary in 2013.

“I found it was amazing how musicians in their youth could produce such great music,” said one comment. “Great band, full sound, great concert, historical,” said another. “I love Claire Devlin playing Body and Soul!” said a third. “This is a bunch of teenagers!!! Sound like seasoned pros,” said a fourth.

One musician said “I was in this band so I'm a little biased! But seriously, in my opinion, this was an extremely talented youth band with players like Emily Denison, Claire Devlin, Sam Cousineau, Deniz Lim-Sersan and others. I'm sure we will see more from these players in the very near future and look back on this recording as a great example of their roots.”

In particular, respondents liked hearing and supporting “young upcoming musicians”. “Many go on to study music - what a great way to promote young talent,” one pointed out. The “program supports local, youth jazz musicians and by proxy, interest in jazz music continuing in the community for years to come,” said another.

Pre-Dawn Skies: "beautiful music"

The runner-up was the thoughtful and nuanced duo album by guitarist Garry Elliott and pianist Steve Boudreau, Pre-Dawn Skies.

Read more: Local jazz CDs inspire many viewpoints - but they're not well enough known

 

Jazz fans vote for radio shows with longest and newest hosts as favourites

Jazz fans have decided what they liked most about jazz in Ottawa-Gatineau in 2013, in The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll. These poll results are part of the complete report that OttawaJazzScene.ca is publishing this week.
Find out more about this poll and view all the results.

Favourite jazz radio show: In a Mellow Tone (CKCU-FM)

Runner-up: Swing is in the Air (CKCU-FM)

How the poll defined this category: “A jazz radio show originating in Ottawa or Gatineau.”

Ron Sweetman has hosted jazz fans' favourite CKCU's In a Mellow Tone for 38 years ©Brett Delmage, 2010

This month is Ron Sweetman's 38th anniversary of hosting In a Mellow Tone on CKCU-FM. He's picked up many listeners and fans over the years, which makes it no surprise that his show was convincingly voted favourite in this category.

As one listener said, the Wednesday night show has had “a sustained quality and selection of music for over 35 years”. Another described it as “THE best, bar none.”

“Ron Sweetman's knowledge of all genres of jazz is legendary,” said one. “Ron is one of the longest and strongest supporters of jazz in Ottawa.”

The show (which also features occasional guest hosts) was particularly praised for its music selections, and the variety of jazz that it includes. It “covers a lot of ground,” said one listener. Another praised the wealth of knowledge, the historic retrospectives, and the fact that it was “not afraid to not be trendy”.

Swing is in the Air: the swingin-est!

The runner-up, Swing is in the Air on CKCU-FM, was hosted by Jacques Émond for decades until his death last year, building an audience both for his beloved swing but also other mainstream jazz. The Sunday afternoon show now has four rotating hosts (Vince Rimbach, Ralph Hopper, Karen Oxorn, Cameron Garbutt), three of whom are local jazz musicians, most of whom hadn't previously hosted radio shows.

“Sunday afternoons is good time to be listening to jazz and the variety of hosts give an excellent mix of music and information. Vince Rimbach is particularly knowledgeable,” was one comment.

Several listeners praised the inclusion of local content: “Great rebirth of programming, focused on local musicians as well as old favourites.” [In Transition and Rabble Without a Cause were also praised for featuring local musicians.]

Read more: Jazz fans vote for radio shows with longest and newest hosts as favourites

 

Jazz fans head west for their favourite bars, cafés, and restaurants

Jazz fans have decided what they liked most about jazz in Ottawa-Gatineau in 2013, in The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll. These poll results are part of the complete report that OttawaJazzScene.ca is publishing this week.
Find out more about this poll and view all the results.

Favourite Jazz Bar, Café or Restaurant: Brookstreet Hotel Options Jazz Lounge

Runner-up: Zola's Italian Restaurant and Eatery

How the poll defined this category: “These nominees offered jazz at least once a week throughout most of 2013.”

Just over a year ago, the Options Jazz Lounge at Brookstreet Hotel in Kanata moved to offering jazz seven nights a week. It now has a weekly jazz jam, and has steadily increased the variety of acts it showcases, bringing in more acts from out of town, and partnering with the Ottawa Jazz Festival for both its summer and winter festivals.

An intent audience listens to the Roddy Ellias Trio at Brookstreet Hotel Options Jazz Lounge. ©Brett Delmage, 2013It's no surprise, therefore, that Brookstreet was well ahead as the favourite in this category.

“Relaxed atmosphere, great music, good acoustics. Very comfortable for serious listening” was one listener's reason for preferring Brookstreet. “Some great talent, just have to buy a drink and enjoy the show,” said another. “The range of musicians is great!” said a third.

“It is [a] beautiful venue! I love the stage and the RED piano. That is so cool. The bar is nice too and so is the food. It is nice to get out of the downtown and go to the suburbs for jazz!”

“Band is accessible, music is always different with interpretation varying on standards as invited guests get up and jam. You never know what you're going to get. NHL players frequent the club regularly. I've seen many politicians as well. It's fun to people watch.”

Read more: Jazz fans head west for their favourite bars, cafés, and restaurants

 

OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll: Concert Venues

Jazz fans have decided what they liked most about jazz in Ottawa-Gatineau in 2013, in The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll. These poll results are part of the complete report that OttawaJazzScene.ca is publishing this week.
Find out more about this poll and view all the results.

Favourite Jazz Concert Venue: National Arts Centre Fourth Stage

Runner-up: GigSpace Performance Studio

How the poll defined this category: “A jazz concert venue is defined as a facility where people go to listen to music without talking or socializing during the performance itself. Nominees presented at least five jazz concerts in 2013.”

An attentive audience enjoys an intimate Fourth Stage concert by Phil Nimmons, David Braid, and photographer Nathan Wirth ©Brett Delmage, 2013

The NAC Fourth Stage has been home to many memorable jazz concerts and seated thousands of jazz fans in its 14-year history. Those good memories may have helped it reach favourite status in our concert venue category.

Certainly it has a lot of enthusiastic fans. As one listener summarized: “Amazing sound, lighting, stage, ambiance, tables, space, green room areas, bar service...no place is better for listening intimately to great jazz.”

Another described it as “fancy without being too formal. I like the tables and the bar and meeting other people there. It is a great place to bring visitors to show off the NAC, the downtown canal and Parliament.”

This venue's conversion from a former bookstore has clearly been successful according to listeners' observations: “very intimate and close but big enough that a band can really stretch out without being confined to playing quietly.”

“To me, it's a more natural setting for improvised music. Encourages more of a closer connection with the audience,” said one. Another praised the “attentive audiences”.

Read more: OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll: Concert Venues

 

OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll: Big bands

Jazz fans have decided what they liked most about jazz in Ottawa-Gatineau in 2013, in The OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll. These poll results are part of the complete report that OttawaJazzScene.ca is publishing this week.
Find out more about this poll and view all the results.

Favourite Big Band: Nepean All-City Jazz Band (NACJB)

Runner-up: Los Gringos

How the poll defined this category: “Nominees include bands based within 100 km of Ottawa, with at least nine members and something close to standard big band instrumentation.”

The Nepean All-City Jazz Band has been playing big band jazz, with strong tip of the hat to Canadians as well as the standard repertoire, for more than 25 years now. A labour of love for its high school musicians and director Neil Yorke-Slader, it has won many MusicFest awards, and a number of its alumni are now professional jazz musicians.

Neil Yorke-Slader inspires the Nepean All-City Jazz Band in concert ©Brett Delmage, 2012

The comments praised its “long history of developing fine young performers who are going places”, and the “talented young rising jazz musicians” in the band.

And, of course, its sound: “Mature playing, great ensemble sound, super tight.” One respondent said “They just play great music”. Another praised their “Fantastic energy. Fantastic sound. Fantastic Director. Passionate and excellent delivery.”

“They have as always, a stacked line up of the best young jazz musicians in the city and it shows.”

“The conductor has a passion for jazz that is unmatched. You can tell he is committed to helping students learn the art of jazz. The program promotes board-wide musicianship and social development in today's youth. Lastly, and most importantly, the music produced is top notch and supports local musicianship in the Ottawa area.”

Read more: OttawaJazzScene.ca Jazz Favourites Poll: Big bands

 

NAC Presents to feature Petr Cancura, Marianne Trudel, and Tanya Tagaq this fall

Petr Cancura ©Brett Delmage, 2013

Hometown boy Petr Cancura will finally bring his Juno-nominated band Down Home to a general Ottawa audience this fall.

He'll be here as part of the NAC Presents series, which announced its fall season today. The season includes three jazz/improvised music concerts: Petr Cancura (October 30), Montreal pianist/composer Marianne Trudel (October 25), and throat singer/improviser Tanya Tagaq (November 7).

Based on old black & white photographs of the American South, Down Home is jazz infused with American roots music, from country to blues. Cancura has said the music was specifically inspired by a trip to the Otha Turner Family Goat Roast and blues festival in Mississippi in the summer of 2009. The band's self-titled album was nominated in the Instrumental Album category in this year's Juno Awards.

All the Down Home band's members are from Brooklyn, where Cancura now lives; the band's instrumentation includes Cancura on saxophone, banjo, and musicbox, plus cornet, trombone, tuba, piano, and bass – and, in particular, Cancura's frequent collaborator Richie Barshay on drums.

The album was released in January 2013: that June, Cancura and Down Home played at Carleton University, for a select audience at the university's Alumni Leadership Gala. Since then, he's been back in town in his role as programming manager for the Ottawa Jazz Festival, and played occasionally with other groups this winter: twice with Bumpin' Binary at Mugshots, once at GigSpace with Trekan (with Roddy Ellias and Andrew Downing), and leading the jams at the Winter Jazz Festival.

Pianist/composer Marianne Trudel got a delighted response for her new trio Trifolia last summer, at the Ottawa and Montreal Jazz Festivals. The band's first album, Le Refuge, was named album of the year in Quebec's Opus Awards, and was nominated for a 2014 Juno Award in the Contemporary Jazz Album category.

She's also busy with other projects: composing and arranging for L'Orchestre national de jazz Montréal, arranging for and backing up the vocal trio Triades, and her own groups. She has released five albums since 2005: solo, duo, trio, quintet, septet. At the 2007 Montreal Jazz Festival, she received the Prix Galaxie-Étoiles de Radio-Canada. An inventive improviser as well as a composer, she's also been featured several times at the Guelph Jazz Festival, most recently in a trio with masters William Parker and Hamid Drake.

Read more: NAC Presents to feature Petr Cancura, Marianne Trudel, and Tanya Tagaq this fall

 

Prince Edward County Jazz Festival to offer “all jazz, all the time!" in August

This summer, one nearby festival will offer “all jazz, all the time!” – and feature several Canadian musicians who haven't played in Ottawa in years.

The Prince Edward County Jazz Festival has just announced its 2014 lineup. The mid-August festival will feature major Canadian jazz musicians rarely seen in Ottawa – Guido Basso, Reg Schwager, Lorne Lofsky – and perennial favourites like Renee Rosnes, Rémi Bolduc, and David Braid.

Rémi Bolduc ©Brett Delmage, 2012Three concerts will commemorate legends of jazz, several of whom died recently. The Rémi Bolduc Quartet, with pianist François Bourassa, will pay tribute to Dave Brubeck. Four top Toronto guitarists will remember Jim Hall. And the Brian Barlow Big Band, featuring pianist David Braid, will perform George Gershwin's “Rhapsody in Blue”.

In other shows, pianist Renee Rosnes (from BC, now living in NYC) will appear with her quartet; Toronto jazz veterans Guido Basso and Russ Little will headline the festival's gala; and Braid will perform a solo piano concert.

The festival runs from August 12 to 17, a quiet time in the Ottawa jazz schedule, after Chamberfest and before the jazz camps. It is located primarily in Picton, Ontario. About a three-hour drive from Ottawa, Picton is south-west of Kingston, and near the Sandbanks Provincial Park.

Highlights of this year's festival include:

Wednesday, August 13: Guido Basso has long been known for his mellow tone on flugelhorn, both in the Boss Brass and in smaller groups. He's joined by trombonist Russ Little, who was a founding member of the brass-rock band Lighthouse, belonged to the Count Basie and Woody Herman big bands, and is a long-time session player and jazz leader. They're playing with pianist Robi Botos, bassist Scott Alexander and drummer Brian Barlow, for a dinner and concert at the Huff Estates Winery.

Thursday, August 14: Montreal saxophonist Rémi Bolduc will pay tribute to the late Dave Brubeck by playing the legendary recording Time Out in its entirety. Bolduc will take Paul Desmond's alto sax parts; bassist Fraser Hollins and drummer Dave Laing will provide a strong rhythm section. And, most importantly, versatile pianist François Bourassa should give a sensitive and swinging interpretation of Brubeck's wide-ranging oeuvre.

Read more: Prince Edward County Jazz Festival to offer “all jazz, all the time!" in August

 

H'Art artists and Jesse Stewart collaborate for a multi-media musical theatre show

“Collaborating with the artists at H'Art of Ottawa over the past four months has confirmed for me the idea that we are all musicians and we are all artists,” says Ottawa composer / percussionist / improviser and Juno winner Jesse Stewart.

Two H'Art artists rehearse music on less common instruments (photo from the video by Andrew Hall)

On Wednesday April 30 at the NAC Fourth Stage, he'll join the visual artists of H'Art of Ottawa, to present Turning the Page, a multi-media musical theatre piece. In the past few months, Stewart has been exploring the sounds of less-common musical instruments with these artists.

The live performance, which includes improvised music and dance, is part of a larger project. It also features a group exhibition (showing at Gallery 101 until Saturday) of works on paper by over 70 artists from H’Art of Ottawa and Arts Project Australia, two not-for-profit organizations that provide opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities to make art.

“Everyone is inherently creative. Unfortunately, some people experience barriers to expressing their creativity – often early in life – due to a variety of factors including socio-economic circumstance, physical and/or mental disability, criticism/censorship from people in positions of authority, as well as self-criticism/self-censorship. That is why I consider organizations like H'Art of Ottawa, which facilitates and validates creative expression by people who have experienced challenges in life, to be so important,” Stewart wrote, based on his experience.

Watch the video

 

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