Saturday, March 25, 2017
   
Text Size

Listening to Oscar Peterson has given Rémi Bolduc a new view on jazz

Over the last two years, Montreal saxophonist Rémi Bolduc has immersed himself in pianist Oscar Peterson's music – and developed an immense respect for Peterson as a composer and musician as a result.

Saxophonist Rémi Bolduc is paying hommage to Oscar Peterson in his current tour with his quartet, including bassist Fraser Hollins. ©Brett Delmage, 2012Bolduc has just released a tribute CD to Peterson, Swingin' with Oscar, with his arrangements of Peterson's compositions. He is currently on tour with his quartet playing this music throughout Ontario and then further east, including a stop in Gatineau on April 12.

And, in the process, he's broadened his outlook on jazz. It used to be that when Bolduc listened to albums by the Canadian jazz icon, he would choose those Peterson made with famous saxophonists.

“I was really focusing on sax players. And I put a lot of my energy into transcribing solos of all sax players. And, of course, I heard Oscar Peterson on some of his records, but because I was checking out Sonny Stitt with Oscar, or Ben Webster with Oscar. I was really always taking the angle of the sax player. And as I get more mature in my music, I opened my mind. I'm like, OK, you've got to go further that that.”

In the fall of 2015, Bourgie Hall at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts asked Bolduc to perform a tribute show to Peterson, to honour the 90th anniversary of Peterson's birth. It was one of a series of tribute concerts he's played there, each time honouring a different jazz master. For the show, he brought in Taurey Butler on piano, along with long-time collaborators Fraser Hollins on bass and Dave Laing on drums.

He said he picked Taurey Butler as the pianist for this project because “we'd played together, and I thought that Oscar had a big influence on him.”

Butler studied classical piano as a child, but stopped playing piano after age 12. “And then he heard Oscar Peterson, and that brought him back to jazz. So Taurey, when he plays, he has that approach. He's really, of course, virtuosic, he uses all kinds of elements on the piano, and the way he plays the chords and his time feel and his whole vocabulary is highly influenced by Oscar Peterson. In Montreal, I couldn't really think of anybody else that had that power when he plays.”

After the concert, “my agent started to call me and say ‘People would be interested to hear that project again.’ And so we did a few concerts, and I decided, OK, let's do a CD. I guess people love that music – especially Oscar Peterson in Canada.”

Read more: Listening to Oscar Peterson has given Rémi Bolduc a new view on jazz

 

French pianist Simon Denizart is inspired by new culture & new musicians in Quebec

Some Canadians might dream of living in Europe, but French pianist Simon Denizart went in the opposite direction. For Denizart, Quebec has been the exotic new land where his jazz career has flourished.

The Simon Denizart Trio (l-r: Simon Bellemare, Simon Denizart, Jeanne Corpataux) performs its first formal Canadian concert outside Quebec at the NAC on March 4 ©2016 Brett DelmageRaised in Créteil, a suburb of Paris, Denizart moved to Montreal in 2011. In 2014, his trio won the people's favourite award at the Festi Jazz International de Rimouski. They've released two albums, toured extensively throughout Quebec and appeared at the Montreal Jazz Festival, and made two tours of Europe, going as far afield as Poland and the Czech Republic.

Radio-Canada named Denizart their Révélation Jazz selection for 2016/2017. It's a considerable honour which has boosted the careers of previous picks.

On Saturday, he'll perform his first formal concert in Canada outside Quebec, when NAC Presents brings his trio to the National Arts Centre Back Stage.

Read more: French pianist Simon Denizart is inspired by new culture & new musicians in Quebec

 

GigSpace Jazz MicroFest puts the local into International Jazz Day

Updated March 5, 2017
GigSpace will celebrate International Jazz Day in April with a new three-day festival promoting Ottawa's jazz musicians.

GigSpace 2017 MicrFest logoThe GigSpace Jazz MicroFest will debut on April 28 to 30, with performances by 38 local musicians in 15 shows. The music will range from well-known and not-so-standard jazz standards, to groove based compositions, to folk and roots-inspired cabaret music, to lyrical modern jazz originals. The musicians will be familiar to readers of OttawaJazzScene.ca: many are popular names with long jazz careers here.

“It's a community-building effort,” said Marilee Townsend-Alcorn, the artistic director of the 45-seat concert venue. “It's raising the profile of the musicians in Ottawa. It's showing that we do have stellar musicians in our midst, playing at a very high level.”

The festival is a project that the GigSpace organizers have been wanting to undertake ever since they opened. “Probably every time there's a jazz festival, someone says, 'Wouldn't it be nice to just have Ottawa-only musicians? A festival for just the Ottawa people.' And we've all said that for five years,” she said.

GigSpace director and guitarist Tim Bedner in particular has been driving the project. With Canada's 150th birthday this year, “He really put the push on. 'Let's make it happen!'”

Read more: GigSpace Jazz MicroFest puts the local into International Jazz Day

 

The Stretch Orchestra (video)

©2016 Brett DelmageThe Stretch Orchestra is back in Ottawa on Friday, for two shows at GigSpace Performance Studio that may end up as a live recording.

The group, with Kevin Breit on guitars and mandolin, Jesse Stewart on percussion, and Matt Brubeck on cello, creates music that is energetic, complex, and fun, coming out of their joint background as jazz improvisers but drawing from almost every genre imaginable to create their very individual sound.

OttawaJazzScene.ca's Inside the Scene interviewed all three at their last show in Ottawa at Ontario Scene in 2015. It was very difficult to keep a straight face. And you can see what makes their music uniquely theirs in excerpts from their NAC Fourth Stage performance.

– Brett Delmage

Related: The Stretch Orchestra makes jazz bend [interview with Matt Brubeck]

Watch the Inside the Scene video story

 

Jazz tuba advocate Keith Hartshorn-Walton blows his own horn

Keith Hartshorn-Walton is behind the tuba and he'll be out front at his concert on Friday ©Brett Delmage, 2017

Keith Hartshorn-Walton is an advocate for the jazz tuba, but he’ll blow his own horn when he leads a group for the first time in Ottawa this Friday. His unusual quartet will also feature John Geggie on double bass, Michel Delage on drums, and Peter Hum on keyboard.

Ottawa listeners have heard Hartshorn-Walton play front-line tuba in a variety of groups in the past year: in Safe Low Limit, with his wife and vocalist Mélanie Hartshorn-Walton, and in various jams. Some might be surprised that he is a multi-instrumentalist.

“Since moving to Ottawa, it's been my pleasure to just really focus on the tuba,” Hartshorn-Walton said. “But when I was living near Toronto I was playing a piano, tuba, bass, bass trombone, and organ in churches. So that's a lot of different instruments.”

Not to mention the tuba’s cousin, the sousaphone, which he plays in Mike Essoudry's Bank Street Bonbons.

Hartshorn-Walton says he’s always aspired to play the tuba as a front-line instrument.

“It's something I always wanted to do, from the very beginning almost, and having more and more chances to do it. But you have to make those chances happen – you can't wait around. No one's going to call you. You show them it's possible, and then they're interested.”

“That's what I did here. I started going to the jam sessions and playing a bit – and more projects started happening. But you always have to be a bit of an advocate for it. Any other tuba player has done that. They tend to be evangelizing about the tuba all the time,” he said, laughing.

As other musicians have been, he was introduced to his uncommon instrument of choice by an early school experience.

“I started piano at age 6. Then when it came time to start band, they wanted to put me originally on electric bass and drums but I wanted to take an instrument home like everybody else, so I took a tuba home. And I surprised my parents with it one day. That was in Grade 7. And I've never stopped.”

Read more: Jazz tuba advocate Keith Hartshorn-Walton blows his own horn

 

Chris Maskell and Gentiane MG play approachable yet complex jazz

Chris Maskell and Gentiane MG Duo
Live @ Record Runner
Record Runner Rehearsal Studios, Ottawa
Friday, January 27, 2017 - 7:30 p.m.

View photos by Brett Delmage of this performance

The minimalist configuration of tenor sax and keyboards is not your usual jazz group. Most musicians would add a rhythm section of bass and drums and possibly another horn. But Chris Maskell and Gentiane MG (Michaud-Gagnon) showed that the two instruments could speak very well together in an intimate show in Ottawa.

 ©Brett Delmage, 2017

Saxophonist Maskell and pianist Gentiane MG met through McGill University, where both are currently studying in the demanding Masters in Jazz Performance program. They've played several shows together in Montreal, and demonstrated an easy camaraderie in this show, which was Gentiane MG's Ottawa debut.

This was also only the second show in the Live @ Record Runner series. The Record Runner Rehearsal Studios are somewhat hidden away in the west-end Colonnade Road business park, which was bleak and dark that January evening and could have used street numbers more visible from the road. However, there is regular OC Transpo service to the park, with bus stops right at the building. Once inside, the studios were notably warm and welcoming, and even offered refreshments at the intermission.

The concert was held in a cozy and comfortable 37-seat “Great Room”. Record Runner owner Paul Adjeleian has made a point of designing good acoustics and sound separation into the studios. Gentiane MG’s keyboard sounded clear and warm using the room's built-in speakers. The room was full, including some of Maskell's friends and family from Ottawa.

The set list was primarily standards, but performed with intense attention. The duo began with “Gemma”, a ballad by Maskell which he's performed in other Ottawa shows. It contrasted rough-edged saxophone with quiet piano in an expressively romantic piece.

I liked how Gentiane MG opened “Solar”, with careful, spacious piano lines reminding me of a nursery rhyme – and then gradually modulating into a more resonant and emotional rendition. Maskell's saxophone entered quietly, and they embarked on a thoughtful conversation, finding variations in the piece's theme.

Read more: Chris Maskell and Gentiane MG play approachable yet complex jazz

 

The Rachel Beausoleil Quartet evokes the elegance and beauty of Jobim's music

The Rachel Beausoleil Quartet: “Happy Birthday, Tom!”
Doors Open For Music at Southminster
Southminster United Church, Ottawa
Wednesday, January 23, 2017 – 12 noon to 1 p.m.

To many North Americans, the composer Antonio Carlos Jobim is synonymous with Brazilian jazz. With his Grammy-winning albums in the 60s and his elegant melodies and subtle bossa rhythms, he created such a recognizable sound that it defined a genre.

In Brazil, he's an icon. In fact, one of the mascots for the Rio Olympics was named “Tom” (the Brazilian nickname for Jobim) after a public vote.

While everyone's heard “The Girl from Ipanema” and “Corcovado” (Quiet Nights), Jobim also wrote many other memorable songs which are not as well known. And, sung in the original Portuguese, his melodies sound even more fluidly beautiful.

It was, therefore, a real treat to have Ottawa vocalist Rachel Beausoleil sing an entire programme of Jobim in Portuguese, for a concert at Southminster United Church in their Wednesday noon series. She was accompanied by guitarist Garry Elliott, bassist Mark Alcorn, and drummer Marilee Townsend-Alcorn.

Beausoleil is currently writing her doctoral thesis on “Música Popular Brasileira” (MPB), a major genre of Brazilian music which includes Jobim's compositions. She's made three extended trips to Brazil in order to take classes from master vocalists, attend conferences, and perform with musicians there – and gained considerable fluency in Portuguese and knowledge of Jobim's music.

Read more: The Rachel Beausoleil Quartet evokes the elegance and beauty of Jobim's music

 

"Let's play!" Jane Bunnett and Miguel de Armas combine their jazz and Afro-Cuban energy

When Ottawa pianist Miguel de Armas and Toronto saxophonist Jane Bunnett got together to play for the first time a few years ago, they didn't want to stop.

Miguel de Armas is celebrating 5 years of composing and performing in Canada with this show  ©Brett Delmage, 2015Bunnett still remembers their after-dinner jam at her house in Toronto. “We just kept doing tune and tune after tune. It was like, Omigod, as I was winding down, Miguel was winding up! He was this incredible atomic energy. It's why we love Cubans. This is why they're just amazing. They're so full of energy and creative spirit and collaboration, and let's go for it. We played and played, probably for a couple of hours, to my neighbours' chagrin, and definitely after midnight.”

At their Ottawa concert this Saturday, the music will be limited to 75 minutes, but the zest for playing will be there as much as ever.

Bunnett is one of the best-known proponents of Afro-Cuban jazz in North America; her ground-breaking and award-winning recording, Spirits of Havana, released in 1991, was the first major collaboration of North American and Cuban musicians. De Armas had an extensive professional jazz career in Cuba before coming to Canada.

Saturday's concert will be their first public performance together.

The show will also mark de Armas' fifth anniversary in Canada. He came here to marry Yasmina Proveyer, a Canadian who now acts as his manager and spokesperson. De Armas quickly found a musical niche in Ottawa, performing at festivals and clubs here and in Montreal and southern Ontario. He's made a point of playing with a wide variety of musicians, both inside and outside the Latin community.

Read more: "Let's play!" Jane Bunnett and Miguel de Armas combine their jazz and Afro-Cuban energy

 

The Caroline Cook Trio shares jazz grooves in a warm mid-winter show

Jazz Grooves for the February Blues
The Caroline Cook Trio

Les Brasseurs du Temps, Gatineau
Saturday, February 4, 2017 – 8 p.m.

View photos by Brett Delmage of this performance

On the set list for this concert, each song had a rhythm marked against it: bossa, medium swing, jazz waltz, groove, jazz shuffle, gypsy jazz, and more. But they all had this in common: an approachable vibe which warmed the audience on a blustery winter evening.

Vocalist Caroline Cook enjoyed listening to the other two members of her trio - Normand Glaude on bass and harmonica and  Kevin Barrett on guitar - in her trio show at BDT. ©Brett Delmage, 2017

This was the first time that Ottawa vocalist Caroline Cook had played professionally with Toronto guitarist Kevin Barrett, whom she met when he was on the faculty of the JazzWorks Jazz Camp. As she told the audience, “I said to Kevin we're going to play together one day – and we did!”

Together with Ottawa double bassist Normand Glaude, they had originally planned to do a house concert in Manotick. When that series was cancelled, Cook moved the show to BDT, where she had previously held several successful shows.

It was very much the jazz trio show it was billed as, rather than vocalist with accompanists. In fact, Cook wasn't even on-stage for the first song of each set. Instead, she left the opening numbers to Barrett and Glaude – and particularly Glaude's harmonica and the evocative melodies he can coax from it.

Read more: The Caroline Cook Trio shares jazz grooves in a warm mid-winter show

 

One-third of 2017 Juno jazz nominees don't live in Canada

In a year of national celebrations showing Canadians' pride in and attachment to their country, the national music awards have nominated a surprising number of jazz ex-pats living in the United States.

See the list of 2017 Juno Award nominees in the jazz and related categories

Saxophonist Mike Murley is nominated in the 2017 Juno Awards for Mealwood's long-anticipated album, Twenty, while pianist David Braid is nominated for his chamber jazz album, Flow. Both are Canadian residents, living in Toronto. ©Brett Delmage, 2015The 2017 Juno Award nominations were released this morning. Among those selected in the three Juno jazz categories were NYC residents Darcy James Argue, Bria Skonberg, Brandi Disterheft, Renee Rosnes, and Seamus Blake – as well as Quinsin Nachoff, who divides his time between Toronto and NYC. That's more than one-third of the 15 nominees in the jazz categories.

In 2016, only one of 15 musicians or groups nominated in the jazz categories was based in the U.S. In 2015, two of 15 were American-based.

Most of the remaining 2017 nominated jazz artists are from the greater Toronto area.

To be eligible for a Juno award, musicians must directly submit their albums for judging. For each category, the Junos establishes a 10-person expert judging panel, whose first task is to make a first selection from all the submitted albums (which could be as many as 40 or 50) to five nominees. Each panel member then ranks the nominated albums in a second round of voting, and the album with the most votes wins.

As usual, the jazz categories cover a wide range of styles, from Argue's large-scale orchestrations to samba-flavoured vocal duets to jazz fusion. Notable are Metalwood's reunion twenty years after their Juno award-winning debut and fourteen years since their last release, and the Order of Canada Band, composed of renowned jazz musicians who have been awarded that national honour, paying tribute to Oscar Peterson's compositions.

Almost all the nominees are different from those nominated in 2015 or in 2016.

See the full list of jazz award nominees

 

Beeched Wailers attract keen listeners and players for 1st jam night at Bar Robo

Beeched Wailers' Tuesday Jazz Jam
Bar Robo
Tuesday, January 24, 2017 – 8:30 to 11 p.m.

View photos of the Beeched Wailers' jam on January 24, 2017 by Brett Delmage

Bar Robo was filled with jammers on the stage and waiting to play on the first Tuesday of the bi-weekly Beeched Wailers jam ©2017 Brett DelmageThe Beeched Wailers drew a full and enthusiastic crowd of players and listeners to the first night of their new jazz jam location on January 24. They'll be back for a second night tonight (February 7).

The jam has moved to what Wailers' trumpeter Nick Dyson described as “more comfortable surroundings”: Bar Robo in Chinatown, which is in the same location as the former Raw Sugar Café. It has a sleek vibe and good sight lines, as well as a proper stage and decent acoustics. The beer, coffee, and soft drink prices are reasonable, and the bar also offers an interesting line in exotic meat and veggie hot dogs.

While the jam remains on Tuesday evenings, it will now run every second week rather than weekly.

On the first night, jammers – including high school and university students – were already lining up to play at 8 p.m. The Wailers played one song and then relinquished the stage until 10:15 p.m., when they performed their traditional closing set.

Read more: Beeched Wailers attract keen listeners and players for 1st jam night at Bar Robo

 

Page 1 of 15

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>