Thursday, September 01, 2016
   
Text Size

The swinging style of Denielle Bassels

For Toronto vocalist Denielle Bassels, swing music is a happy escape – one that she likes sharing with her audiences.

“I just love that sound. I'm drawn to this kind of rhythm, swing and happy rhythm, because I think it's an escape for me. You know, to feel this happy, driving force. It just takes you away from the monotony of life, and things that might be bothering you at the time, which for me is kind of an escape.”

Vocalist Denielle Bassels will give a sneak peek of her upcoming CD at GigSpace Saturday with her quintet, including saxophonist Jacob Gorzhaltsan and bassist Scott Hunter. ©Brett Delmage, 2014

And for her audiences? “I like to take them with me me, yes!”

Bassels and her quintet will perform this music – including selections from her upcoming CD – at GigSpace this Saturday, August 20. It will be her first full show in Ottawa proper, although she was a big hit at Merrickville's Jazz Fest in 2014.

Although Bassels is a big fan of Ella Fitzgerald, her music isn't just standards. Rather, it's a blend of her own originals, and covers of songs written anytime between the 1920s and the 1960s – all in a swinging style.

Why that style? “Because that's the way I feel the song. There's a lot of songs that I love that aren't swing, and I just find that when I do take a stab at singing them myself, there's just this rhythm they seem to fall in. I feel more attached to the song and more invested in the song when it feels right to me. And with that rhythm, it just flows more.”

Read more: The swinging style of Denielle Bassels

 

Trumpet Bootcamp gives students a different perspective

Besides the larger jazz camps where many different instruments are played, Ottawa also supports several camps devoted to players of a single instrument. This week, it's the turn of the trumpet.

Trumpet Bootcamp will present trumpeters in many combinations, from duets to large ensembles, in its free jazz and classical concerts this week on Thursday and Friday evenings in the Patrick Cardy Studio at Carleton University. ©Brett Delmage, 2014

This is the sixth year that Nick Dyson has run his Trumpet Bootcamp at Alcorn Music Studios. The camp, from August 15 to 19, is a chance for young trumpeters to get up to speed before the school year – and its free student concerts will provide music lovers a chance to hear trumpets in different combinations.

“It's not your typical jazz camp, because we cover both jazz and classical music,” Dyson told OttawaJazzScene.ca. “It's more about fundamental trumpet playing and music making.”

In jazz, trumpets are heard in big bands in packs of three or four, and singly in combos along with other instruments. But the trumpet is also featured in classical music, including in chamber ensembles and symphony orchestras.

Dyson is keeping both jazz and classical music “on equal footing” at the camp, he said, “because it's not about jazz music, it's not about classical music – it's about trumpet, and the way that the trumpet fits in to that [music]. I try to blur the lines as much as possible.”

Read more: Trumpet Bootcamp gives students a different perspective

 

The 2016 Merrickville's Jazz Fest gets funkier and celebrates John Lennon

In 2016, Merrickville's Jazz Fest is getting funkier – and celebrating John Lennon in jazz.

Toronto's Red Hot Ramble will perform New Orleans-style jazz, funk, and blues  photo: Sean Ryan The mid-October festival released its full line-up today, featuring musicians from Toronto, Montreal, and Ottawa-Gatineau. Opening with the grooving funk of Ottawa's ERU-ERA, and ending with the 70s-style horn band The Pharoahs, its shows will range from New Orleans-style to modern jazz, but definitely on the harder-hitting side than in previous years.

Highlights include

  • Toronto guitarist Michael Occhipinti presenting his “Shine On: The Universe of John Lennon” jazz project;
  • Red Hot Ramble from Toronto playing New Orleans-style jazz, funk, and blues;
  • the quartet of Ottawa pianist/trombonist Mark Ferguson playing his melodic modern jazz compositions, with touches of classical, Latin, and bebop;
  • and the ten musicians in The Pharoahs bringing back the joy of Tower Of Power, James Brown, and Chaka Khan with their “Soul Sckool” show.

Read more: The 2016 Merrickville's Jazz Fest gets funkier and celebrates John Lennon

 

'I got rhythm': Rob Frayne takes the helm at the JazzWorks jazz camp

With a new voice at the helm and many new faces in its faculty, Ottawa's oldest jazz camp will sound different this year.

Rob Frayne is emphasizing rhythm this year at the JazzWorks jazz camp ©Brett Delmage, 2008.Saxophonist and composer Rob Frayne has taken over as music director of the JazzWorks jazz camp, which runs August 18-21 – and for 2016, he's focusing on rhythm.

The camp workshops will emphasize “rhythm or phrasing or swinging” – both in playing instruments and in singing, Frayne told OttawaJazzScene.ca. “That has been something that I think needs focusing on. And that's the big change this year.”

That doesn't mean just percussion. “There's one workshop [saxophonist] Christine Jensen is giving on articulation, how to make rhythmic phrasing with straight eighth-notes in a jazzy way.”

Vocalist Julie Michels and pianist Dave Restivo are teaching “how to groove vocally in different styles. And I'm doing one with [pianist] Steve Boudreau just on how to set up time, you know a rhythm feel, and then change and develop that feel. These are all things that most students wouldn't think of.”

That's not the only change in the 23-year-old camp this year. There's a significant alteration in its faculty. Long-time instructors like Christine Duncan, Jim Lewis, Frank Lozano, and Kevin Barrett are missing. Double bassist John Geggie, who co-founded the camp and had directed it for decades before announcing his retirement last year, will not be at the camp this year, either.

Replacing them are musicians from Montreal, Toronto, and NYC with impressive resumes: multi-Juno-winning saxophonist Christine Jensen, bassist Jim Vivian, guitarist Lorne Lofsky, trumpeter Bill Mahar, trombonist William Carn, saxophonist Don Braden, percussionist Alyssa Falk, and pianist Yves Léveillé.

Frayne said this “changing of the guard” was caused by several factors, including work conflicts. Kevin Barrett, for example, is performing at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland, and pianist Nancy Walker is working on a composing commission, he said. “So people have other stuff to do, which has happened before, but it's coincidental that it's [happening] all at once.”

Read more: 'I got rhythm': Rob Frayne takes the helm at the JazzWorks jazz camp

 

2016 Carleton U Jazz Camp goes all-Ottawa, with afternoon concerts

The Carleton University Jazz Camp is sticking closer to home this year.

The camp, which runs from August 8 to 12, will be featuring its long-time Ottawa faculty this year, and not bringing in any instructors from out of town. It also has moved its faculty concerts, which are open to the public, from the evening to the afternoon.

The Carleton University Jazz Camp won't be bringing in outside musicians like John MacLeod (l) this year, or featuring a big band, because of budget cuts ©Brett Delmage, 2012

In its previous six years, the camp had been regularly including one to four instructors each year from elsewhere in Canada, and even renowned American saxophonist Dave Liebman in 2014.

The instructors are a who's-who of Ottawa's jazz scene, including double bassist John Geggie, drummer Mike Essoudry, trombonist/pianist Mark Ferguson, guitarist Tim Bedner, vocalist Elise Letourneau, trumpeter Nick Dyson, trombonist Ryan Purchase, guitarist Wayne Eagles, and camp director and saxophonist Mike Tremblay. Several are regular instructors at Carleton. Carleton music professor James McGowan will also be teaching at the camp.

Ferguson told OttawaJazzScene.ca that the camp had had “substantial” budget cuts this year, which meant they couldn't afford to bring instructors from outside Ottawa.

Read more: 2016 Carleton U Jazz Camp goes all-Ottawa, with afternoon concerts

 

The Ottawa and Gatineau jazz scenes strut their stuff in August

It's a lower-key month in August, as the Ottawa jazz scene looks inwards.

Vocalist Denielle Bassels and clarinetist Jacob Gorzhaltsan were a hit at Merrickville's Jazzfest in 2014. Their swinging jazz energizes GigSpace on August 20.  ©Brett Delmage, 2014


Sign up to our JazzScene newsletter to get a full listing of all the jazz and improvised music events within 100 km of Parliament Hill in your inbox every week. You can also check our list of Ottawa-Gatineau-area jazz clubs, and our daily On The Scene listing on our website's front page (and in our RSS feed) to learn more about what's going on in jazz locally right now.


While some visiting musicians are back in Ottawa, including the Sultans of String, Boston saxophonist Benny Sharoni, NYC vocalist Kiran Ahluwalia and guitarist Rez Abbasi, Toronto vocalist Denielle Bassels, and Toronto bassist Dan Fortin, what you'll hear this month is mostly home-grown – and in some new combinations.

Look for high-profile shows featuring pianist Steve Boudreau, Afro-Cuban vocalist Caridad Cruz and pianist Miguel de Armas, guitarist Rômmel Ribeiro, and Modasaurus, as well as a tribute to ground-breaking jazz bassist and composer Charles Mingus.


OttawaJazzScene.ca's August jazz highlights are brought to you by Peggy Holloway, Alrick Huebener, Nancy Preston, Richard Thibodeau, Peter Turner, Judd Richardson, Chris Smelser, Mike Steinberg, and Riek van den Berg. We greatly appreciate their financial support that helps OttawaJazzScene.ca to continue serving the jazz community every day of the year.


Read more: The Ottawa and Gatineau jazz scenes strut their stuff in August

 

A show of thanks: Mike Rud honours jazz guitarist George Benson this weekend

Updated July 27 to include Thursday show in Montreal.

Montreal jazz guitarist and Juno-winning composer Mike Rud is a frequent visitor to Ottawa, most recently this month for a sold-out duo gig with Peter Bernstein. He's back this weekend for two nights at the Options Jazz Lounge at the Brookstreet Hotel in Kanata and a Sunday afternoon gig at the Record Centre, paying tribute to best-selling guitarist George Benson.

Mike Rud will pay tribute to George Benson, a jazz guitarist who profoundly affected his playing, at Brookstreet and at The Record Centre this weekend. ©Brett Delmage 2012While Benson is best known for his Grammy-winning song, “On Broadway”, he's had a long jazz career, playing with Miles Davis, Stevie Wonder, and Freddie Hubbard, and winning 10 Grammys for albums spanning jazz, pop, and R&B. He performed at the Ottawa Jazz Festival in 2010.

The shows are part of drummer Michel Delage's continuing monthly tribute series at Brookstreet, and Rud will be playing with Delage and bassist Alex Bilodeau. But the choice of George Benson was all Rud's.

OttawaJazzScene.ca editor Alayne McGregor talked with Mike Rud about the shows, and his love of George Benson's music, earlier this month. This is an edited version of the interview.

OttawaJazzScene.ca: Why did you suggest doing a tribute to George Benson?

Mike Rud: Because, if I think of a particular artist whose artist I'm familiar enough with to feel like I've done a good review before going ahead – it would probably be Benson. There would only be two or three guys that I'd really feel that I'd listened to their whole catalogue, and Benson's certainly one of them.

OttawaJazzScene.ca: When did you first hear him?

Rud: I had a guitar teacher when I was in high school named Brian Hughes, who's an adult contemporary jazz guitar star. He lives in California now. And it was Brian who turned me on to George Benson. Brian used to play a couple of tunes from Benson's catalogue in his show, and he gave me the source recordings. He said, 'Well, if you like that, you should listen to this record.' I got them, and I just couldn't believe it!

Read more: A show of thanks: Mike Rud honours jazz guitarist George Benson this weekend

 

Ernst Reijseger at Chamberfest: reinventing how audiences see and hear the cello

Cellist Ernst Reijseger has a constant passion for music and for musical invention (seen here with vocalist Mola Sylla at the 2014 Guelph Jazz Festival) ©2014 Brett DelmageErnst Reijseger was exhausted.

The celebrated Dutch cellist and composer had just finished two back-to-back recording sessions for film soundtracks, one for Werner Herzog's latest documentary and the other for an American feature film, when OttawaJazzScene.ca interviewed him on July 15.


More about Ernst Reijseger
Ernst Reijseger takes risks to create unpredictable music
• 
Jesse Stewart, David Mott & Ernst Reijseger share a passion for invention & improvisation


But one thing did energize him – the thought of just playing, in a series of concerts at the 2016 Ottawa Chamber Music Festival from July 23 to 26.

“Just taking my cello and playing – I'm really looking forward to that.”

This week, he's in Ottawa for the very first time, playing four concerts (two free, two ticketed) at the festival. They'll range from a short introductory concert and interview, to a solo show for children, to a celebration of the cello with 11 other cellists, to completely free improvised jazz. But all of them will be informed by Reijseger's iconoclastic approach to the cello and the different sounds he creates with it.

Read more: Ernst Reijseger at Chamberfest: reinventing how audiences see and hear the cello

 

Jesse Stewart, David Mott & Ernst Reijseger share a passion for invention & improvisation

Jesse Stewart ©Brett Delmage, 2011David Mott ©Brett Delmage, 2013Ernst Reijseger ©Brett Delmage, 2014
(l-r) Jesse Sterwart, David Mott, and Ernst Reijseger
share a common passion for making music
in the moment   photos ©Brett Delmage

When Dutch cellist Ernst Reijseger, Toronto baritone saxophonist David Mott, and Ottawa percussionist Jesse Stewart first played together in Toronto in 2014, it was a memorable concert.

“He's a showman,” Stewart recalls. “The concert we did in Toronto, it was actually at David's karate dojo. Towards the end of the concert we knew this was going to be the last piece and Ernst stood up and was playing while he was walking.

“And he left the room, and he was still playing! He was in another room where there was all David's martial arts equipment and while he was still playing cello and walking, he started knocking stuff over with his foot. We could hardly play because we were laughing so hard. It was so, so funny! But, yes, he's a showman, that's for sure. But also incredibly musical and just a wonderful improviser.”


More about Ernst Reijseger
• Ernst Reijseger takes risks to create unpredictable music
• Ernst Reijseger at Chamberfest: reinventing how audiences see and hear the cello


The three will reunite in Ottawa on Tuesday, July 26, for a late-night Chamberfringe concert. It's one of several concerts which Reijseger is performing at the 2016 Ottawa Chamber Music Festival, but, unlike the others, this concert will be leaning much more in the direction of free jazz.

Read more: Jesse Stewart, David Mott & Ernst Reijseger share a passion for invention & improvisation

 

Page 1 of 76

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>