Friday, August 28, 2015
   
Text Size

The Miles in the Sky Ensemble captures the electric in Miles Davis

The duets between Linsey Wellman and Ed Lister captured the excitement of Miles Davis' electric period in the Miles in the Sky Ensemble's show at the Arboretum Festival. ©Brett Delmage, 2015

The Miles in the Sky Ensemble
Arboretum Festival
Albert Island, Ottawa River
Friday, August 21, 2015 - 11:30 p.m.

View photos of this performance

When Miles Davis turned his jazz electric in the late 60s and early 70s, it was much more than a change in instrumentation. The new music was fused with rock concepts, it was run through effects generators, it was amplified, and it was charged with excitement.

That excitement was captured by the Miles in the Sky Ensemble in its late-night show at the Arboretum Festival Friday. In their 90-minute show, the ensemble produced a highly interactive and often thrilling performance, playing pieces from four of Davis' electric/jazz fusion albums (although, oddly enough, none from his Miles in the Sky album).

Read more: The Miles in the Sky Ensemble captures the electric in Miles Davis

 

Pilar and the Sicilian Jazz Project replaced jazz cool with passion (review)

Pilar and the Sicilian Jazz Project
Ottawa Chamberfest, Chamberfringe series
Saint Brigid's Centre for the Arts, Kildare Room
Saturday, August 1, 2015 – 10 p.m.

In many jazz shows there's a subtle distance between the performers and the material. It's part of the jazz cool: a way of looking at the music both from the inside and the outside, of standing apart.

Pilar and The Sicilian Jazz Project were having none of that, in their late-night Chamberfringe show August 1.

Rarely have I seen performers – and particularly singers – who immersed themselves in the music as much as Franco-Italian vocalist Pilar and Canadian-Sicilian vocalist Dominic Mancuso did in this show. In almost every song, their voices, their faces, their hands, and their entire bodies were communicating the intense emotion in the lyrics and music.

It was an emphatically “hot” concert – both the vocals and the concentrated, jazz-fusion-flavoured instrumentals.

The project is the brainchild of Toronto jazz guitarist/composer Michael Occhipinti, and is based on his own Sicilian family heritage, as well as field recordings made by musicologist Alan Lomax in Sicily in 1954. It's a rethinking of original folksongs through the lens of Occhipinti's jazz sensibility, rhythms, arrangements, and improvisation.

Read more: Pilar and the Sicilian Jazz Project replaced jazz cool with passion (review)

 

Jazz Monday: The Sean Duhaime Trio fills Le Petit Chicago with fusion

Jansen Richard ©Brett Delmage, 2015

This month Le Petit Chicago is hosting a reunion. After a three-year hiatus, Ottawa guitarist Sean Duhaime is again performing with his long-standing jazz trio.

They've been filling the downtown Gatineau club with standards and originals, played with a jazz fusion edge. The trio: Duhaime on electric guitar, Laura Greenberg on electric bass, and Jansen Richard on drums, is the August host band for the long-running Jazz Mondays series.

When OttawaJazzScene.ca heard the trio on August 17, they played a wide-ranging set for the first hour: everything from a bright, catchy version of the jazz standard “Autumn Leaves”, to the dirty blues of “Let It Ride” by the Robert Glasper Experiment, to the electric fusion of Duhaime's own “Bert”.

They opened with a dynamic rendition of Sonny Rollins' “Tenor Madness”, and continued with the ballad “Little Lady” by Vince Rimbach, with an evocative and emotional guitar solo from Duhaime. A Duhaime original, “Tomadachi”, quickly built up the energy with high-speed guitar and gravelly bass lines, along with varied and energetic drumming – and ending with a cymbal tap.

Read more: Jazz Monday: The Sean Duhaime Trio fills Le Petit Chicago with fusion

 

Trio Jérôme Beaulieu doesn't miss a beat in show with drummer Greg Ritchie

Jérôme Beaulieu ©Brett Delmage, 2015

Trio Jérôme Beaulieu
Festival de Jazz Desjardins
Parc de l'Imaginaire, Gatineau (Aylmer)
Friday, July 31, 2015

View photos of this performance

In many ways, Parc de l'Imaginaire, a small greenspace next to the Aylmer Marina, is an ideal place to hear music. Quiet and intimate, it's verdant and shady and cool even in a heat wave. Musicians playing in the park's small covered bandstand can easily be seen from a 270 degree circle in the park.

The Festival de Jazz Desjardins, which has been held there mid-summer for the last 29 years, attracts an interested audience which consistently fills the park and listens carefully – which was a perfect match for Montreal pianist Jérôme Beaulieu's music, whose melodicism reaches out to this audience.

Beaulieu's trio had two crowd-pleasing Ottawa concerts in 2014 – at the National Arts Centre and at the Ottawa Jazz Festival. In the 75 minutes of this show, their first Gatineau concert, they connected with the audience just as strongly.

They had some obstacles: Beaulieu's long-time drummer had another gig and this was the trio's first show with his (temporary) replacement, who necessarily had to work from charts. And the high winds that were the remnants of that day's unsettled weather meant that all the musicians were fighting to keep their sheet music from being blown away, holding it down with multiple clips.

The replacement, on the other hand, was veteran drummer Greg Ritchie, well-known for his work with Christine Jensen and Joel Miller. Ritchie just recently returned to Montreal after a decade playing in the New York City jazz scene. He joined bassist Philippe Leduc in the trio, and adeptly adapted his playing to the music: swinging on a Monk tune; more nuanced brushes behind quiet, intricate piano on a tribute to pianist Chilly Gonzales; intense and propulsive on a Beaulieu original.

Read more: Trio Jérôme Beaulieu doesn't miss a beat in show with drummer Greg Ritchie

 

Brian Barlow's classic big band arrangements are a big hit

There were many smiles during and after the Carleton University Faculty Big Band Concert ©Brett Delmage, 2015

The Jazz Camp Faculty Big Band, led by Brian Barlow
Carleton University Jazz Camp
Kailash Mital Theatre, Carleton University
Friday, August 7, 2015 – 7 p.m.

View photos of this concert

If you closed your eyes, it felt like a 50s ballroom in Harlem. You could almost see dancers gliding and swinging across the floor to the energetic music.

With Brian Barlow in command, the Carleton University Jazz Camp Faculty Big Band played classic big band music Friday night, and particularly favourites by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn. There were lots of smiles on stage, and many listeners swaying to the music in the audience.

For more than 15 years, Barlow was the percussionist in Rob McConnell's Boss Brass, and that's only part of his decades of experience performing in and arranging for big bands. He currently leads his own big band, for which he originally wrote the arrangements featured at this concert.

Read more: Brian Barlow's classic big band arrangements are a big hit

 

The Emie R. Roussel Trio balances melody and groove in a happy Festival Desjardins show

Emie R. Roussel (piano) and Sébastien Pellerin (bass) easily commanded the attention of the audience at le Festival de Jazz Desjardins ©Brett Delmage, 2015Emie R. Roussel Trio
Festival de Jazz Desjardins
Parc de l'Imaginaire, Gatineau (Aylmer)
Thursday, July 30, 2015

Quebec jazz pianist Emie R. Roussel attracted an attentive audience and a standing ovation for her 75-minute show in Parc de l'Imaginaire in Aylmer Thursday. Her free concert was the second in this year's Festival de Jazz Desjardins, which runs until Saturday.

Together with her trio, Roussel performed originals, mostly from her 2015 album, Quantum, plus some from her previous CD, Transit. That 2013 CD featured the trio in dramatic conversation with a string quartet, while Quantum added more groove and R&B colours to classic piano jazz.

It was much the same material as Roussel played in her National Arts Centre debut in April. However, to my mind, the music was better integrated in this show, the groove underlining but not overwhelming the more delicate, introspective moments.

“Funambule” (Tightrope Walker) showed the more romantic, dramatic side of the trio, with an emphatic double bass solo from Sébastien Pellerin, and ringing keyboard lines. It received strong applause. On the other hand, drummer Dominic Cloutier introduced “Club” with a strong rat-a-tat drum solo which grew in complexity and intensity. Joined by Pellerin's electric bass and Roussel's Fender Rhodes-like keyboards, that piece strongly reminded me of 70s organ trio music, with a touch of funk – a cheery and crowd-pleasing number.

Read more: The Emie R. Roussel Trio balances melody and groove in a happy Festival Desjardins show

 

The Drew Jurecka Trio plays swirling rhythms with verve and enthusiasm

Drew Jurecka Trio
Ottawa Chamberfest, Chamberfringe series
Saint Brigid's Centre for the Arts, Kildare Room
Friday, July 24, 2015 – 10 p.m.

The Drew Jurecka Trio's bright music was an immediate hit with its Chamberfringe audience Friday night.

The trio's combination of violin, piano, and double bass was a natural for their upbeat repertoire: mostly jazz standards from the last hundred years, combined with a few Jurecka originals. But it was how they played that material – with verve, style, and enthusiasm – that set the concert alight.

Jurecka is a veteran on the Toronto jazz scene, primarily playing violin but also doubling on many other instruments, including clarinet and saxophone. A long-time member of the late Jeff Healey's Jazz Wizards, he currently tours with Jill Barber, and leads his own groups like the Hogtown Syncopators and the Hot Jazz String Quartet. He has also backed Diana Krall, Shirley Horn, and Dianne Reeves.

For 85 minutes, the trio – with Mark Kieswetter on piano, and Clark Johnston on double bass – kept their late-night audience not only awake, but clapping enthusiastically after each song and each solo. There were relatively few jazz regulars in attendance, but there was an immediate connection to the music in an audience which ranged from 20-year-olds to seniors.

They opened with the sweet, romantic “Lady, Be Good!” by the Gershwins, which featured swirling violin lines over a dancing beat on piano and bass. It set the tone for the concert: a warm vibe, infectious rhythms, and lots of smooth interplay among the trio.

Read more: The Drew Jurecka Trio plays swirling rhythms with verve and enthusiasm

 

Majestic, beautiful music from Abdullah Ibrahim and the Mukashi Trio (review)

Abdullah Ibrahim “Mukashi” Trio
Studio Series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Studio
Tuesday, June 30, 2015

In Ottawa, South African pianist Abdullah Ibrahim communicated strictly through his music. During his trio's 90-minute concert on the last night of the Ottawa Jazz Festival, much was said, but not a word was spoken.

The three musicians – Ibrahim on grand piano, Noah Jackson on cello and double bass, and Cleave Guyton on clarinet, flute, and piccolo – performed an uninterrupted flow of music for the entire concert, without announcing any of the pieces. They did, however, have scores in front of them, and Jackson said afterwards that Ibrahim signaled them musically as to which piece he wanted to play next.

The cumulative effect was majestic and beautiful.

The 300-seat NAC Studio was completely sold out, and the audience was already primed – judging by the vehement initial applause – to enjoy the music. But it was also clear that Ibrahim's trio kept the listeners' attention throughout. No one moved, no one left.

Read more: Majestic, beautiful music from Abdullah Ibrahim and the Mukashi Trio (review)

 

The Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra: a rich hour of evocative solos & fine ensemble playing (review)

The Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra with Ingrid Jensen
Laurier Avenue Music Stage
Ottawa Jazz Festival
Sunday, June 28, 2015 – 7:30 p.m.

The Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra played for one hour at the Ottawa Jazz Festival Sunday.

It was a very rich hour, filled with evocative solos, fine ensemble playing, and an overall abundant sound.

But when I later read that the 19-piece orchestra had played for nearly two hours at the Vancouver Jazz Festival, that confirmed how curtailed the Ottawa show felt. It was part of the early evening series at the Laurier Avenue Music Stage, where concerts were generally scheduled for only an hour to avoid sound bleed with the Main Stage and to allow time for sound-checking the late-evening shows. That time constraint led to a hurried concert.

The Ottawa show was the last stop on an extended tour which crossed Canada and went down into the U.S. Because the logistics and costs of taking 19 musicians on the road are daunting, it was a milestone for the orchestra. Jensen said the band had played nine shows in the previous two weeks – more than they had in the past five years.

Read more: The Christine Jensen Jazz Orchestra: a rich hour of evocative solos & fine ensemble playing (review)

 

The Enrico Rava Tribe makes joyous, complex music for a happy audience (review)

Enrico Rava Tribe featuring Gianluca Petrella
Studio Series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Studio
Thursday, June 25, 2015 - 9 p.m.

From the first delicate notes filling the NAC Studio, it was clear that this show was going to be a spectacular pairing. The warm lines from Enrico Rava on flugelhorn and Gianluca Petrella on trombone intertwined into a finely-tuned soundscape.

The 75-year-old Rava, a veteran of Italian jazz, and the 40-year-old Petrella have been performing together since Petrella was 22. That experience showed; they could play intensely in unison, or create complementary melodies, or contrast smooth and frantic lines. And always they were working together to create a joyous experience.

They were also strongly supported by the driving rhythm section of Giovanni Guidi on piano, Gabriele Evangelista on double bass, and Fabrizio Sferra on drums. Guidi, in particular, added to the drama and nuance of every piece. His playing could be sparkling fast, or romantic, or accented with added glissandos; once he twanged the strings inside his grand piano.

Rava didn't announce the names of any of the six pieces played in this concert, or whether they were from any specific album. But they clearly all fit together. They tended towards the dramatic, often beginning quietly and building up to multi-layered behemoths with Petrella's trombone slicing through.

Read more: The Enrico Rava Tribe makes joyous, complex music for a happy audience (review)

 

Too much choir, not enough jazz: A Filetta, Paolo Fresu & Daniele di Bonaventura

A Filetta – Paolo Fresu & Daniele di Bonaventura
Studio Series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Studio
Thursday, June 25, 2015 – 7 p.m.

From the Ottawa Jazz Festival's description, you might have reasonably concluded that this concert was an improvised jazz duet between Italian trumpeter Paolo Fresu and bandoneon player Daniele di Bonaventura, with some choral singing in the background.

Not quite.

A Filetta, a six-member a cappella male choir from Corsica, was front and centre on the Studio stage, and took the majority of the concert's time and attention. Fresu and di Bonaventura were primarily accompanying or soloing around their voices, and there were many times when only the choir was heard.

The choir, which formed in 1978, sings in Corsican, with the objective of saving that island's oral patrimony. In 2006, they first performed with Fresu and di Bonaventura. They all released an album together on ECM in 2011: Mistico Mediterraneo.

Read more: Too much choir, not enough jazz: A Filetta, Paolo Fresu & Daniele di Bonaventura

 

Kyle Shepherd plays with unexpected rhythms in his piano trio concert (review)

Kyle Shepherd Trio
Improv Invitational series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Fourth Stage
Friday, June 26, 2015 – 8 p.m.

The South African pianist Kyle Shepherd, who is not yet 30, has garnered a great deal of attention in his short career – including at this concert, which was completely sold out. The lobby outside the Fourth Stage was a zoo, with many listeners I had not previously seen at jazzfest concerts, including one man in floor-length African tribal dress.

The concert was part of the festival's five-show South Africa NOW! Series, and was introduced by South Africa's High Commissioner to Canada.

Shepherd played selections from his most recent album, Dream State, a double CD featuring his own compositions. He began the concert by sitting on the bench of the piano, carrying a wooden skewer and a long stake with an open loop at one end. He played a single note on the piano and then began creating metallic sounds by tapping the stake – as well as whistling through its top. Throughout, he was applying effects, making it sound as though it were being played underwater. Then he looped the music and started lightly chanting over the result while continuing to tap.

Read more: Kyle Shepherd plays with unexpected rhythms in his piano trio concert (review)

 

Joe McPhee, Jesse Stewart & Nicolas Caloia create music that's out of the ordinary

Jesse Stewart / Nicolas Caloia / Joe McPhee
Improv Invitational series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Fourth Stage
Saturday, June 20, 2015 – 8 p.m.

The first thing my tablemate said when he sat down in the Fourth Stage was “What, no waterphone?” And, in fact, this concert went back to the basics in terms of instrumentation: Nicolas Caloia simply on double bass, Jesse Stewart just on a standard drumset without extra percussion or waterphone, and Joe McPhee alternating among tenor and soprano sax and pocket trumpet. Unlike many musicians I heard at this year's festival, they used no effects; they played strictly acoustically.

But the sounds they produced with those instruments were anything but ordinary.

All three have a long pedigree in avant-garde jazz and free improv. McPhee (from Poughkeepsie, NY) has performed with European and American masters including Ken Vandermark, Peter Brötzmann, Evan Parker, Mats Gustafsson, and The Thing, as well as in his long-time Trio X with bassist Dominic Duval and drummer Jay Rosen. He's also a conceptual thinker in creative improvisation with his concept of “Po” (process of provocation) music.

Read more: Joe McPhee, Jesse Stewart & Nicolas Caloia create music that's out of the ordinary

 

Jef Neve's dramatic piano compositions enthrall his Ottawa Jazz Festival audience

Jef Neve
Improv Invitational series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Fourth Stage
Monday, June 29, 2015 – 8 p.m.

Michael Bates' Northern Spy
Great Canadian Jazz
Ottawa Jazz Festival
Confederation Park
Monday, June 29, 2015 – 6:30 p.m.

Jef Neve is a Belgian pianist and composer with considerable credits in both classical and jazz, who has been touring and recording as a jazz artist for more than a dozen years now, including performing with vibraphonist Pascal Schumacher and American singer José James. He had just come from five days of performing in Japan before this show, and afterwards was heading off to Vancouver.

He's a polished performer – musically, in his appearance (three-piece brocade suit), and in his easy rapport with the audience. This was the first time he'd performed in Ottawa, but his demeanour throughout his solo piano show was natural and comfortable.

Neve had to compete with Pink Martini's full house in Confederation Park, so the Fourth Stage looked a bit empty to start but filled in throughout the first half-hour as listeners came in from the 7 p.m. Studio show. At the beginning, almost the entire audience was in the south half of the room, the better to see Neve's hands on the piano keyboard.

His set-list was a mixture of standards and originals, performed with verve but also sensitivity. He started by playing thunderously on the strings inside his grand piano, following that up with rumbling bass lines, and then letting vibrating notes resolve into a melody. It was Billy Strayhorn's “Lush Life”, performed gracefully and with added flourishes. Neve said later that the song had added meaning for him because of Strayhorn's role as a composer from a young age.

Read more: Jef Neve's dramatic piano compositions enthrall his Ottawa Jazz Festival audience

 

From hypnotic groove to intimate duets: two very different French groups at the Ottawa Jazz Festival (review)

Céline Bonacina Trio
Improv Invitational series: Spotlight on French Jazz
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Fourth Stage
Saturday, June 27, 2015 – 6 p.m.

Airelle Besson and Nelson Veras - Prelude
Improv Invitational series: Spotlight on French Jazz
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Fourth Stage
Saturday, June 27, 2015 – 8 p.m.

Half an hour into Céline Bonacina's concert at the Ottawa Jazz Festival, her trio was filling the Fourth Stage with a deep, hypnotic groove. Loud and all-encompassing, the groove was created by her fluid, circling lines on baritone sax, hard drumming, and deep bass notes.

It was typical of a concert that featured standard jazz instruments, but used them in different ways, altered them with effects and looping, and replaced swing with funk rhythms. Bonacina switched among baritone, alto, and soprano sax, and was joined by Olivier Carole, playing a five-string electric bass (with an added deeper string), and Hary Ratsimbazafy on drums.

It was what could only be described as an in-your-face show.

The French saxophonist primarily plays the baritone sax. Now the baritone can be a melodic instrument, or a mainstay of the rhythm section, but Bonacina played it as both. She easily drew out different sounds from it, and repeatedly used circular breathing to create extended vibrating lines. There was almost an element of cognitive dissonance hearing a person so short and slim producing such intense, huge sounds from that saxophone.

Read more: From hypnotic groove to intimate duets: two very different French groups at the Ottawa Jazz Festival (review)

 

The joy in Robi Botos' music delights an Ottawa Jazz Festival audience (review)

Robi Botos Quartet with Seamus Blake
Great Canadian Jazz Series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
Confederation Park
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 – 6:30 p.m.

Toronto pianist Robi Botos communicates a real joy in music when he plays. He had a big smile on his face as he began his Ottawa Jazz Festival concert Tuesday, and told the crowd how excited he was to bring, for the first time, his original music here as leader.

He also had a new album to promote – Movin' Forward [A440/Universal, 2015]  – and a new sound that's more his own.

When Botos won the TD Grand Prize at the Montreal Jazz Festival in 2012, his music still showed the strong influence of his mentor, Oscar Peterson. Botos certainly hasn't lost either his delicate touch on ballads or his driving rhythm on straight-ahead pieces, but he's developed and expanded his own sound. Now there's touches of funk and electronics adding a modern edge as well.

And he has good taste in musical collaborators: both the album and this concert featured ex-pat Canadian, now NYC tenor sax player Seamus Blake. Blake is one of those saxophonists with a major reputation; I've made a point of hearing him every time he's played in Ottawa in the last few years and his playing has always substantially enhanced the music.

Read more: The joy in Robi Botos' music delights an Ottawa Jazz Festival audience (review)

   

Emil Viklicky turns his Moravian heritage into melodic and dramatic jazz (review)

Emil Viklicky “Grand Moravia” Trio
Improv Invitational series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
National Arts Centre Fourth Stage
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 – 8 p.m.

Emil Viklicky is a pianist and composer from Moravia, the south-eastern region of the Czech Republic. Besides a jazz career spanning 40 years, he's also written several operas and TV and film scores. In 2004, Wynton Marsalis commissioned him to orchestrate the prison letters of former Czech President Václav Havel for a big band concert at Lincoln Centre.

And consistently throughout his career, Viklicky has used the folk music of his native Moravia as an inspiration for his jazz and classical compositions. As he said in one interview, that's his “calling card”. While he can play jazz standards, those folksongs are what he grew up with, and his own musical language.

Almost all of the pieces in this concert incorporated these Moravian themes, performed by Viklicky on piano with Petr Dvorsky on double bass and Cyril Zelenak on drums.

Read more: Emil Viklicky turns his Moravian heritage into melodic and dramatic jazz (review)

   

Duchess: “Girl-on-girl harmony” in a very easy to enjoy show (review)

Duchess
Great Canadian Jazz Series
Ottawa Jazz Festival
Confederation Park
Saturday, June 20, 2015 – 6:30 p.m.

There was a time when jazz didn't take itself too seriously.You went to a jazz show to have fun, to dance, to get cheered up.

The vocal trio Duchess – Amy Cervini, Hilary Gardner, and Melissa Stylianou – did its damnedest to bring back that era at its Ottawa Jazz Festival concert Saturday. Supported by a strong rhythm section, they sang cheerful jazz standards in tight harmony, in a show that was very easy to enjoy.

“Girl-on-girl harmony” is how the trio describes its music, and a great deal of it was sung in unison. They alternated verses and even lines, and their voices melded well as they celebrated the songs – which were mostly from the 1930s to 50s, and which they described as “timeless”. They followed that theme through by dressing similarly – though not identically – in well-cut, blue polka-dot dresses in a distinctly retro style.

Read more: Duchess: “Girl-on-girl harmony” in a very easy to enjoy show (review)

   

Ottawa Jazz Festival's late-night jam an upbeat completion to Saturday's music

Festival programming manager Petr Cancura (l) listens to a swinging duet by jam hosts pianist Steve Boudreau (on June 27-30) and guitarist Roddy Ellias. All three played with a variety of guest musicians throughout the jam  ©Brett Delmage, 2015

Ottawa Jazz Festival Late-night jam
Spin Kitchen & Bar, Ottawa Marriott Hotel
10:30 p.m. Saturday, June 20 to 1 a.m. Sunday, June 21, 2015

View photos of this jam by OttawaJazzScene.ca photojournalist Brett Delmage

Jazz fans who wanted an upbeat end to Saturday evening would have enjoyed the Ottawa Jazz Festival's late-night jam session. For 2½ hours, Spin Kitchen & Bar was filled with fast-moving jazz, with a good participation by both local and visiting musicians.

The house band – Roddy Ellias (guitar), John Geggie (double bass), and Nick Fraser (drums) – all have years of experience running jams. They opened with a half-hour set of three standards, including “Cheek to Cheek” and “Domino”. Each was given an extended treatment, and the music quickly captured the attention of the listeners near the stage.

By 11 p.m., the room, seating approximately 50 with clear sight lines to the stage, was mostly full. Ellias called up local pianist Steve Boudreau to the stage to join the band for several instrumentals. That set the shape of the music for the evening: energetic with lots of interplay, including a swinging duet between Boudreau and Ellias. The audience responded with continued appreciative applause.

Read more: Ottawa Jazz Festival's late-night jam an upbeat completion to Saturday's music

   

Ottawa Jazz Festival June 19 - jam session (review)

Even a short stay at the first night of jamming on June 19 gave me a good feeling for what to expect late at night at this year's Ottawa Jazz Festival.

Walking in at 11 p.m., I saw a pianist intently bent over his keyboard, his hair obscuring his face. He was producing long strings of separated notes, clearly playing free jazz improv. Guitarist Roddy Ellias standing nearby on the stage, was responding to and contributing to the pointillist flow, together with John Geggie on double bass and Nick Fraser on drums. The music kept cornering unexpectedly – you couldn't predict where it would go – but it was very clear there was a strong thread connecting all four.

Read more: Ottawa Jazz Festival June 19 - jam session (review)