Saturday, November 22, 2014
   
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The Brian Browne Trio shows why the jazz piano trio has enduring appeal (review)

Brian Browne Trio
NAC Fourth Stage, Ottawa
Saturday, November 15, 2014 – 7:30 p.m.

View photos from this concert.

The energy was palpable inside the NAC Fourth Stage on Saturday, as pianist Brian Browne, bassist Neil Swainson, and drummer Terry Clarke began to play.

Brian Browne Trio ©Brett Delmage, 2014

But it was almost as much from the audience as from the stage: these were listeners intent on and eager for the music. The room was completely packed, filling almost as soon as the doors opened, and there were lots of smiles on faces as first Clarke appeared, then Swainson, and finally Browne.

Clarke began the evening with a complex and changing series of patterns on his drum using brushes; after a minute or so, Swainson added in a steady, full-bodied bass riff; and then Browne entered with a strong swinging piano. It was a full-on trio production – lots of interplay, changing tempos alternating between more syncopated and more bluesy, and trading fours (alternating quick solos) between Clarke and Browne – before ending in a strong flourish.

The trio then slowed down for a delicate and heartfelt version of Burt Bacharach's “What the World Needs Now Is Love”. That set the pattern for the evening – varied but always melodic. Browne had no sheet music in front him, playing instead from memory, and the two sheets of paper on the piano just had some song titles jotted on them, not a formal, numbered set list.

Read more: The Brian Browne Trio shows why the jazz piano trio has enduring appeal (review)

 

The Alex Goodman Trio presents a wide-ranging show of fast, fluid jazz (review)

Alex Goodman ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Alex Goodman Trio
Brookstreet Hotel Options Jazz Lounge, Ottawa
Friday, November 14, 2014 – 8 p.m.

View photos of this evening

This July, Alex Goodman won first prize and the Public's Choice Award at the Montreux Jazz Festival International Guitar Competition. He is the first Canadian to ever win this competition.

Listeners at the Options Jazz Lounge on Friday could hear that technical skill – and considerable composing chops as well – when Goodman's trio appeared there last Friday. In three sets over three hours, the trio combined Goodman's originals and less-common standards for a fast-moving and enjoyable evening.

Goodman has released four albums, the latest being a series of solo guitar études released in 2013; his previous album, Bridges, was a quintet release and a JUNO nominee in 2011 for contemporary jazz album of the year.

For this show, he teamed up with a different trio than on his recordings: Fabio Ragnelli on drums and Rick Rosato on double bass. All three have considerable experience in the Canadian scene (Goodman and Ragnelli until recently in Toronto, and Rosato in Montreal), but currently live in New York City.

They opened with a Cole Porter number, “From this moment on”, fast and swinging with extended improvisation on guitar and bass. Goodman noted later that Porter was one of his favourite composers, and included another of his songs, “You Do Something to Me”, which also had lots of room for exploration while retaining the sweetness of the melody.

Read more: The Alex Goodman Trio presents a wide-ranging show of fast, fluid jazz (review)

 

The Adam Saikaley Quartet sets the walls to grooving at Mugshots (review)

(l-r) Adam Saikaley, Alex Moxon, Marc Decho, Mike Essoudry ©Brett Delmage, 2014

The Adam Saikaley Quartet
Mugshots (Nicholas Street Jail Hostel)
Saturday, November 15, 2014 – 10 p.m.

View photos from this performance

In order to get into Mugshots, you must cross the courtyard where convicted murderers were hanged. On a winter's night, it's dark and filled with shadows, and the grey metal door leading into the bar is more security-conscious than inviting.

But inside on Saturday night, the Adam Saikaley Quartet filled the room with bright, inviting music.

The bar is located on the ground floor of of Ottawa's former jail (now a hostel). It's a long low space, with thick stone walls, curving brick-lined ceilings, and heavy pillars marching down the centre of the room. Vibrations travel really well through the floors and walls – which only increased the intensity of the quartet's grooves.

A year ago, Saikaley started bringing his jazz quartet, with Linsey Wellman on sax and clarinet, Joe Hincke on bass, and Mike Essoudry on drums, for monthly shows at Mugshots. They've been playing there regularly ever since, with Marc Decho recently replacing Hincke. This fall, Saikaley wrote all new arrangements for the group, featuring everything from Ornette Coleman free bop, to 60s and 70s modal jazz, to Brazilian samba, to Afro-Cuban and African rhythms.

But always the groove, as was obvious Saturday. Guitarist Alex Moxon was sitting in for Wellman, and Saikaley's keyboards set up a strong Rhodes-like vibe which easily reached into every corner. Starting with classics like Freddie Hubbard's “Little Sunflower”, their first set had a strong jazz fusion feel. Lead lines on keyboards and electric guitar glided over propulsive rhythms on drumset and double bass, and the whole was warmly received by a generally-young crowd. When OttawaJazzScene.ca's editors left at midnight, there was still lots of energy in the room.

Read more: The Adam Saikaley Quartet sets the walls to grooving at Mugshots (review)

 

Whiplash drums up the tension, but doesn't do justice to jazz (movie review)

Whiplash [2014]
Directed by Damien Chazelle
ByTowne Cinema (November 14-27, varying times)

Whiplash starts with a drumbeat – one that becomes steadily faster and fiercer. We look down a long white corridor and there, silhouetted in a doorway, is Andrew Neiman [Miles Teller], playing his heart out on the drums late at night. And then an older man appears, listening carefully. When Andrew stops, he orders him to keep going – and play harder than ever.

Left to right: Miles Teller as Andrew and J.K. Simmons as Fletcher. Photo by Daniel McFadden, Courtesy of Sony Pictures ClassicsThat scene sets the tempo for this movie – a breakneck-paced examination of a toxic relationship between student and teacher. Full of unexpected twists and jolts, it's 106 minutes of psychological intensity almost to the level of breakdown.

As a piece of cinema, this film is brilliant: beautifully shot, tightly directed, and well-acted. But I suspect most jazz musicians (especially drummers) and educators are going to have problems with it, because its presentation of jazz and its processes is seriously warped.

Andrew is a first-year student at the fictional Shaffer Conservatory of Music in Manhattan [possibly based on the Juilliard School], which he describes as the greatest music school in the country. He has immersed himself in jazz and drumming for years, and hero-worships Buddy Rich.

Terence Fletcher [J.K. Simmons] is a jazz pianist and teacher at the conservatory, renowned for his high standards, and always on the prowl – even late at night – for new talent for his award-winning Studio jazz band. Cool and elegant in a tight black T-shirt and jeans, he seems the epitome of the ageless jazz musician and an obvious role model for Andrew.

Read more: Whiplash drums up the tension, but doesn't do justice to jazz (movie review)

 

A memorable evening of Gypsy Jazz & more with Tcha Limberger and Denis Chang (review)

Tcha Limberger ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Tcha Limberger and Denis Chang
NECTAR (the New Edinburgh Community and Arts Centre)
Thursday, November 13, 2014 - 7 p.m.

View photos of this evening

Even arriving early on a cold winter night, you could hear the jazz. Shining violin and bright guitar music was spilling out of the room where the musicians were warming up, lively jazz standards that only increased the anticipation of the audience members waiting in the hall.

This all-acoustic concert featured Flemish-Gypsy prodigy Tcha Limberger on violin and occasional guitar, along with Montrealers Denis Chang and William Dickerson on guitar. It was billed as gypsy jazz – and there was certainly lots of that. But, the music covered a wider range, also not surprising given that Limberger's own musical interests go well beyond that genre.

Limberger is descended from a long line of Romany musicians on his father's side, several of whom are renowned in European Manouche circles and helped revive Gypsy jazz in the last 50 years. The trio opened with a piece which was composed by his uncle and grand-uncle, Fapy Lafertin and Biske Limberger. Chang said it was about old-style gypsy life: a bit clichéd but “very nicely put”. Sung in Romany, it was upbeat with a touch of nostalgia with lots of interplay between the violin and guitars.

Read more: A memorable evening of Gypsy Jazz & more with Tcha Limberger and Denis Chang (review)

 

Guelph 2014: Ernst Reijseger plays the cello as you have not heard it before (review)

Ernst Reijseger, Harmen Fraanje, Mola Sylla blended hugely different bodies of music into a coherent and beautiful whole ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Ernst Reijseger – Harmen Fraanje – Mola Sylla
Guelph Jazz Festival
River Run Centre, Cooperators Hall
Thursday, September 4, 2014 - 8 p.m.

Ernst Reijseger solo
Macdonald Stewart Art Centre
Friday, September 5, 2014 - 5 p.m.

Dutch cellist Ernst Reijseger has an enviable reputation – both for the purity and breadth of his technique and the imaginativeness of his collaborations and projects. After starting out playing early and Baroque music, he switched to the avant-garde and jazz. He's performed with top European free jazz musicians like Derek Bailey, Eric Vloeimans, Han Bennink, and Gerry Hemingway, has written and produced film scores for Werner Herzog, and has collaborated with world music artists as well as cellist Yo Yo Ma.

On stage, he's a wild man.

Both of his two concerts at the 2014 Guelph Jazz Festival featured jaw-dropping moments, as Reijseger expanded his audiences' understanding of how the cello could be played while producing lovely and unexpected music.

He turned the cello on its side and played it like a plump guitar – to audible gasps from some listeners. He hit the cello with his bow, and then ripped it savagely across the strings in an example of extreme bowing. He threaded his bow through the strings and then let the bow vibrate while plucking strings. He attached a plastic hair clip and wooden clothes pegs to the strings to dampen and mute their resonance, while still continuing to play. He let the cello swing in his hand, like a pendulum, as he played. He used the cello body as a drum, then shook it, and then moved its bottom spike in and out creating a creaking sound. He wetted his fingers to make the strings squeak. He whipped his bow through the air. He twirled around and around while playing.

Read more: Guelph 2014: Ernst Reijseger plays the cello as you have not heard it before (review)

 

Geri Childs sings about long-time friendship in More than Magic CD release (review)

Mark Ferguson has produced both of Geri Childs' CDs ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Geri Childs “More Than Magic” CD Release Concert
NAC Fourth Stage
Friday, October 31, 2014 - 7:30 p.m.

View photos of this performance

Opening with “Sentimental Journey” and closing with “Just Friends”, Geri Childs sang about love and long-time friendship in her CD release concert on Friday.

In particular, she talked about her friendship and collaboration with Mark Ferguson, her musical director for the CD and the concert, how they met in (of all places!) a hired band providing music for Joe Clark's leadership campaign, and how they worked together in picking the new standards in the CD. But “everyone here is a friend”, she said at the end of the concert, and certainly there were lots of smiles and appreciative applause throughout.

On stage were the same musicians who played on More Than Magic – Ferguson on piano, trombone, and melodica, John Geggie on double bass, Rob Graves on percussion, and Margaret Tobolowska on cello. They were joined by René Gely, on four different guitars, and Sharon Timmins on backup vocals. Gely added an extra percussive element brightening the music, and allowed Ferguson to move off the piano to trombone on some of the jazzier numbers.

Read more: Geri Childs sings about long-time friendship in More than Magic CD release (review)

 

Marianne Trudel Quintet: An exhilarating, subtle start to the 2014-15 NAC Presents jazz series (review)

Marianne Trudel and Ingrid Jensen shared a strong musical link at Saturday's concert. ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Marianne Trudel Quintet
NAC Presents
NAC Fourth Stage
Saturday, October 25, 2014 – 7:30 p.m.

View photos of this performance

Marianne Trudel appeared spent but exhilarated at the end of her quintet's concert at the NAC Fourth Stage Saturday night. The Montreal pianist had just released a new album, La Vie Commence Ici, and this was the last stop on a week-long tour to promote it.

With notable improvisers like Ingrid Jensen and Trudel herself on stage, the show was far more than just a reenactment of the recording. The quintet – the same musicians as on the CD – expanded upon the music, adding new interpretations and texture, in an energetic yet subtle concert.

If the star power in the quintet was provided by Jensen on trumpet, the other four musicians (who played together on Trudel's 2007 live recording) created equally interesting musical moments. It was very much a joint endeavour, with sax and trumpet frequently playing in unison, with several trumpet-piano duets, and with creative bass and drums working together to propel the music forward.

Read more: Marianne Trudel Quintet: An exhilarating, subtle start to the 2014-15 NAC Presents jazz series (review)

 

Evoking the soul of Hank Mobley (review)

Richard Page enjoys some playing by Alex Moxon, who organized the project ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Soul Station Tribute Concert
The Manx Pub
Monday, October 6, 2014

View photos of this performance

I can't remember where I first heard about Hank Mobley, but I suspect it may have been because one of the musicians in this tribute concert was raving about him.

Mobley was a jazz musicians' musician – especially if you're into hard bop and bebop. A tenor saxophonist, he played with Max Roach, Dizzy Gillespie, Horace Silver, Lee Morgan, and Art Blakey – and even for a brief period with Miles Davis.

Between 1955 and 1970, he recorded many albums for Blue Note Records – and Soul Station (1960) is generally considered one of his best. The Penguin Guide to Jazz describes it as the “one Mobley album that should be in every collection”, and praises his rhythmic subtlety, “accenting unexpected beats and planting emphases in places that take his phrasing out of the realms of cliché”.

Read more: Evoking the soul of Hank Mobley (review)

 

The Marianne Trudel Quintet puts joy into their NAC show

Marianne Trudel and Ingrid Jensen frequently collaborated during the quintet's NAC show. ©Brett Delmage, 2014By the time Marianne Trudel's Quintet opened at the NAC Fourth Stage tonight, they were thoroughly warmed up.

The Quintet has been touring to promote Trudel's just-released CD, La Vie Commence Ici, for the last week. By tonight, you could hear the ease in their playing, the confident attack in their solos, and the sheer joy and fire they put into the music. They left many listeners very happy.

Watch for a full review of the concert with photos on Sunday.

    – Alayne McGregor

Read OttawaJazzScene's interview with Trudel about this tour and the CD:

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A cross-Canada celebration of poet P.K. Page in music and dance

Scott Thomson, Susanna Hood, Linsey Wellman at the Improvising Musicians of Ottawa-Outaouais show. Thomson and Hood will present an expanded version of this show in Montreal this week. ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Scott Thomson and Susanna Hood: The Muted Note
IMOO #107
Raw Sugar Café
Ottawa
Sunday, September 21, 2014 - 7 p.m.

Award-winning Canadian poet P.K. Page had her work interpreted as a one-woman play, as a documentary film, and as a print/calligraphy exhibition.

Now composer Scott Thomson has translated a number of Page's imagery-laden poems into music and movement. In collaboration with choreographer and vocalist Susanna Hood, he has produced a new album, The Muted Note, containing compositions based on Page's poems.

This month they began their cross-Canada tour, presenting the music as a dance/music collaboration, with Thomson on trombone and Hood singing and using her body to express the emotion in the words. On September 21, they appeared in Ottawa, performing several pieces from the album in the first half of the show, and then improvising with Ottawa saxophonist Linsey Wellman in the second half.

Many of Thomson and Hood's shows are only as a duo, but this week in Montréal (October 2 to 5), they're enhancing the show with three more dancers and three more musicians, as part of l'OFF Festival de Jazz. The expanded show was also presented in Toronto in early September.

At the Ottawa show, the duo presented six pieces based on Page's poems. Hood sung the words and interspersed them with wordless singing and movement, while Thomson played trombone. It was a quiet, intimate show, well-suited to the cramped space in the Raw Sugar Café (some furniture was moved to give Hood enough space to dance), and kept the audience raptly attentive throughout.

Read more: A cross-Canada celebration of poet P.K. Page in music and dance

 

Ottawa audience enjoys Organic's groove (review)

Nathan Hiltz and Mike Essoudry, in musical conversation. ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Nathan Hiltz's Organic, featuring Bernie Senensky
Zola's Restaurant
Thursday, September 25, 2014 – 7:30 p.m.

View photos of this performance

I love jazz organ music. There's something about the deep throb of a organ – whether a Hammond B3 or a church organ – that adds richness and immediacy to the music. And a lot of groove.

But there aren't that many real Hammond organs out there – or organists – so it was a treat to hear the Toronto quartet Organic in Ottawa for its first appearance Thursday.

Guitarist Nathan Hiltz and pianist/organist Bernie Senensky started playing together every Sunday night at a downtown Toronto club seven years ago. Senensky loved the sound of the club's Hammond B3; Hiltz was influenced by guitarists like Wes Montgomery and Grant Green who had regularly played with organists.

A few years later, they added tenor saxophonist Ryan Oliver and drummer Morgan Childs, and they've been performing weekly as Organic ever since. You could see and hear that familiarity in the quartet's playing: there was an ease and suppleness in how they switched leads and supported each other.

Read more: Ottawa audience enjoys Organic's groove (review)

 

Guelph 2014: John Heward and Barre Phillips are 80-year-olds with oomph (review)

Barre Phillips (bass) and John Heward (drums) ©Brett Delmage, 2014

John Heward and Barre Phillips 80th Birthday Celebration
Guelph Jazz Festival
Macdonald Stewart Art Centre
Wednesday, September 3, 2014 – 8 p.m.

Montreal jazz drummer John Heward is also renowned Canadian painter and sculptor John Heward, and he shows a similar experimental bent in both his artistic pursuits.

For the week of the Guelph Jazz Festival, the main floor walls of the Macdonald Stewart Art Centre featured several of his artworks: canvas painted and twisted into large-scale dramatic pieces. When he performed at the art centre as the first evening show of the festival – with some of his favourite musicians – there was a similar feeling of drama, uncertainty, and flair.

The concert and show were to celebrate Heward's 80th birthday – but only his 31st year as a professional musician. He played the drums as a teenager, but then concentrated on the visual arts. In 1983, at 49 years old, he bought a set of drums, and started playing improvised music. He's played in various avant-garde groups in Montreal, including Nicolas Caloia's Ratchet Orchestra, and PO (“Provocative Operations”). He leads the free jazz group Murray Street Band.

Read more: Guelph 2014: John Heward and Barre Phillips are 80-year-olds with oomph (review)

 

Guelph 2014: Pugs & Crows didn't live up to its talent (review)

Meredith Bates played propulsive violin at the Pugs & Crows concert at the Guelph Jazz Festival ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Pugs & Crows
Guelph Jazz Festival
Macdonald Stewart Art Centre
Thursday, September 4, 2014 – 5 p.m.

View photos of this performance

Pugs & Crows is a Vancouver-based instrumental group which creates “dramatic cinematic music” blending indie rock and modern jazz. Their most recent album, Fantastic Pictures, won the 2013 Juno Award for Instrumental Album of the Year.

They played an hour-long late afternoon show at the Guelph Jazz Festival, to an enthusiastic and packed crowd. Performing with lots of energy and tight arrangements, they went through a good selection of numbers from both their albums, plus a few new pieces.

The group has an unusual lineup, with piano (Cat Toren) and violin (Meredith Bates) joining electric guitar (Cole Schmidt) as lead instruments, together with double bass (Russell Sholberg) and drums (Ben Brown). For this show, their music was accented by guest Tony Wilson on electric guitar and slide guitar, adding fluid lines and strong emotional touches.

Read more: Guelph 2014: Pugs & Crows didn't live up to its talent (review)

 

Local improvisers put on the spot at IMOO season opener (review)

Rory Magill and Mark Molnar ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Concert #106
Improvising Musicians of Ottawa-Outaouais (IMOO)
Raw Sugar Café
Sunday, September 14, 2014

IMOO opened its fourth season on Sunday by returning to its roots in the local scene. It brought together a diverse collection of Ottawa-area improvisers in unexpected combinations, in its first evening in IMOO's new home of Raw Sugar Café.

IMOO organizers Linsey Wellman (alto sax) and David Jackson (guitar) arranged for Ian Birse (electronics and electric guitar), David Broscoe (alto sax, tuning forks, and noisemakers), Laura Kavanaugh (violin), Rory Magill (xylophone and percussion), and Mark Molnar (cello) to play in duos, trios, quartets, and all together. They tried a new format: each group who played would pick the next set of musicians to be thrown together to improvise.

Wellman, Jackson, and Magill began quietly, with shimmering guitar and low tones on sax, and became more intense, with Magill joining in with light taps on xylophone near the end. The collaborations which followed constantly changed textures and sounds: rough-edged violin and cello contrasting with shakers; rattling bells and ringing tuning forks alternating with with buzzing electronically-altered electric guitar and punctuated notes on saxophone. Near the end, there was even an (atypical) string quartet.

Read more: Local improvisers put on the spot at IMOO season opener (review)

 

Guelph 2014: Lee Pui Ming and Dong-Won Kim astonish the audience (review)

Lee Pui Ming and Dong-Won Kim in intense conversation at the Guelph Youth Music Centre. ©Brett Delmage, 2014

Lee Pui Ming and Dong-Won Kim
2014 Guelph Jazz Festival
Guelph Youth Music Centre
Sunday, September 7, 2014 – 10:30 a.m.

The Guelph Jazz Festival rarely deals in the obvious or the tried-and-true, but its 2014 closing concert really confounded the audience's expectations.

Lee Pui Ming is an improvising pianist, composer, and vocalist, who combines classical, jazz, and Chinese traditions, and is active in Toronto's new music community. Dong-Won Kim is a percussionist, composer, and vocalist from Korea, trained in the movements and instruments of that country's traditional music, but with a strong improvising bent,

On-stage was a Yamaha grand piano, and Kim's instruments: the jang-go, an hourglass-shaped drum with hide-covered ends; the buk, a round leather drum; and two hanging bronze gongs.

So piano and percussion, right? Not exactly.

Read more: Guelph 2014: Lee Pui Ming and Dong-Won Kim astonish the audience (review)

   

Collaboration in two acts: Newport Festival Now 60 & the Norma Winstone Trio

2014 Ottawa Jazz Festival, Day 8: Newport Festival Now 60, Norma Winstone Trio
National Arts Centre (Studio and Fourth Stage)
Friday, June 27, 2014

I was curious exactly how this Newport Festival all-star group was going to celebrate the festival's 60th anniversary – in a concert less than two hours long.

Trying to be historically representative would require playing tiny snippets of many songs – not that much fun for the audience. Even trying to reflect all the major styles and types and movements in jazz that have been showcased on that festival's stage since 1954 would have been effectively impossible!

What the septet ended up presenting was an upbeat show of many standards and a few originals – mainstream jazz played with verve, enthusiasm, and quite a dollop of skill. Arguably, that did indeed reflect Newport's spirit and the quality of what it's offered over the decades.

Read more: Collaboration in two acts: Newport Festival Now 60 & the Norma Winstone Trio

   

Real jazz is a big hit in Confederation Park, with Kirk MacDonald and Dianne Reeves

2014 Ottawa Jazz Festival, Day 6: Kirk MacDonald Quartet (Great Canadian Jazz), Dianne Reeves (Concerts Under the Stars)
Confederation Park
Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Confederation Park echoed to the sounds of jazz for the Wednesday night of the Ottawa Jazz Festival.

Not rock, or blues, or pop – although Dianne Reeves did sing some 80s pop hits, substantially revamped into jazz standards. But in the feel, the style, and the groove, the music was pure jazz, in its most enjoyable and accessible aspect – made accessible to the widest possible range of listeners.

Each Ottawa Jazz Festival evening in the park begins with the Great Canadian jazz series. This evening's Canadian group was the Kirk MacDonald Quartet: three Toronto jazz musicians with long pedigrees (MacDonald on tenor sax, Brian Dickinson on piano, and Neil Swainson on bass), plus American drummer Dennis Mackrel, with whom MacDonald has been playing regularly for the last several years.

You could hear the ease with which they followed and underlaid each other's lines, and the respect with which they treated each other. If MacDonald's fluid tenor sax was a strong presence, so was Dickinson's incisive piano, Swainson's melodic bass lines, and Mackrel's tasteful drumming.

Read more: Real jazz is a big hit in Confederation Park, with Kirk MacDonald and Dianne Reeves

   

Virtuosity in improvisation and composition: Colin Stetson & Hamid Drake, Darcy James Argue (review)

2014 Ottawa Jazz Festival, Day 4: Hamid Drake with Colin Stetson, Darcy James Argue's Secret Society
NAC Fourth Stage, Laurier Avenue Canadian Music Stage
Monday, June 23, 2014

Any time someone tells you that jazz is dying or that it only attracts the 50+ audience, you could point them to the concerts on June 23 and 24 at this year's Ottawa Jazz Festival.

On June 23, Snarky Puppy attracted a shoulder-to-shoulder standing-room-only crowd to the festival's outdoor stage in front of City Hall. And most of the listeners I saw there, clearly grooving to the intricate and well-executed jazz-rock mix with a huge dynamic range, were in their 20s or early 30s.

Earlier that evening, Colin Stetson's solo show at the NAC Fourth Stage was completely sold out. According to reports I heard from several listeners in attendance, disappointed fans of all ages were left at the door.

So I decided to show up early for Stetson's show with Hamid Drake the next evening, and was not at all surprised that the Fourth Stage again ended up packed, with most of the festival's Youth Summit members standing near the door. In fact, if the show hadn't partially overlapped with Hiromi's concert in the NAC Studio, I expect it would have attracted even more listeners.

The show was billed as “Hamid Drake with Colin Stetson” – an important distinction, because the show more closely reflected Drake's performance style than Stetson's. In fact, Stetson warned the audience at the beginning of the show that this would not be a repeat of Sunday night.

Read more: Virtuosity in improvisation and composition: Colin Stetson & Hamid Drake, Darcy James Argue (review)

   

The Christian McBride Trio fulfills the tradition; the Darius Jones Quartet fights with it

2014 Ottawa Jazz Festival, Day 11: Christian McBride Trio, Darius Jones Quartet
National Arts Centre
Monday, June 30, 2014

It was an evening of “inside” versus “outside” at the National Arts Centre, on the last evening of the Ottawa Jazz Festival.

Playing “inside”, primarily standards with a few originals, was the trio of bassist Christian McBride, with pianist Christian Sands and drummer Ulysses Owens, Jr. They looked extremely snazzy as they hit the stage, each wearing a well-cut suit, and McBride sporting a pair of cream-coloured horn-rimmed glasses. It was a visual cue to the music they were about to play: strongly in the tradition, and very professional. And, of course, swinging.

The NAC Studio was packed to overflowing for this concert, and not all the long line-up of listeners got in. McBride could have easily filled a much larger venue. Those who did get in got value for their money: the trio played for almost two hours. Each song was given lots of room for exploration, lasting about ten minutes each.

Read more: The Christian McBride Trio fulfills the tradition; the Darius Jones Quartet fights with it